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20 Biggest Hall of Fame Snubs of All Time

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Each year, players, managers and contributors are placed on a ballot waiting to be enshrined into their respective Hall of Fames. While most of the greatest players are enshrined, there are other players who are on the outside looking in, waiting for their opportunity for immortality. Here are the 20 biggest Hall of Fame snubs of all-time. Note: Only players are eligible for this list.

20. Dave Andreychuk

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20. Dave Andreychuk

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Dave Andreychuk scored 640 goals in his career, including 274 on the power play, the most in NHL history, yet his name is not in the Hockey Hall of Fame. To cap it off, Andreychuk is also a champion, winning his lone Stanley Cup in 2004 with the Tampa Bay Lightning.

19. Phil Housley

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19. Phil Housley

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When he retired from the game, Phil Housley was the all-time leader in points scored and games played by an American, and he was a defenseman. Also at the time of his retirement, Housley trailed only Ray Bourque, Paul Coffey and Al MacInnis in career points. Unfortunately, he holds the record for most games player without a Stanley Cup title.

18. Robert Horry

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18. Robert Horry

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Robert Horry will never be a superstar like Michael Jordan or LeBron James, but he is the winningest player outside of the 1960s Boston Celtics with seven championships. Horry also contributed to each of his seven rings, winning two with the Houston Rockets, three with the Los Angeles Lakers and two with the San Antonio Spurs. He also earned the nickname "Big Shot Rob" because of his play during clutch situations.

17. Curtis Joseph

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17. Curtis Joseph

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Curtis Joseph may have never hoisted the Stanley Cup, but he has won an Olympic gold medal and was definitely a winner. No goalie in NHL history has more wins without a Cup than CuJo with 454. Joseph was a solid netminder for 20 seasons, and had winning seasons for five different teams.

16. Eric Lindros

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16. Eric Lindros

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Concussions and injuries hampered Eric Lindros' career, yet he was still one of the NHL's top players. When he retired, Lindros ranked 19th in career points with 1,138, made six All-Star Game appearances and was the Hart Memorial Trophy (Most Valuable Player) during the 1994-95 season.

15. Jerome Bettis

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15. Jerome Bettis

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Jerome Bettis is among the 10 most prolific rushers in NFL history, yet he has yet to hear the call from Canton. During his career with the Los Angeles Rams and Pittsburgh Steelers, "The Bus" ran for more than 13,000 yards during his career and won a Super Bowl in his final game with the Steelers. But Bettis' most memorable moment was his fumble in the 2005 Playoffs against the Colts which almost cost the Steelers that Super Bowl.

14. Kevin Johnson

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14. Kevin Johnson

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Before Derrick Rose and Russell Westbrook, Kevin Johnson was the proto-type for an athletic point guard. During his 12-year career with the Cleveland Cavaliers and Phoenix Suns, Johnson averaged 17 points and nine assists per game while leading Phoenix to their most successful stretch in franchise history. Johnson made the playoffs in each of his seasons with the Suns, leading them to the 1993 NBA finals, a six-game loss to the Chicago Bulls.

13. Jeremy Roenick

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13. Jeremy Roenick

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Jeremy Roenick was one of only three American-born players to eclipse the 500-goal plateau, yet unlike Mike Modano and Joe Mullen, Roenick is not enshrined in the Hockey Hall of Fame. Roenick certainly has the stats to belong, but his off-ice incidents, including two investigations into gambling on sports, are probably the main reasons why Roenick is on the outside looking in.

12. Jerry Kramer

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12. Jerry Kramer

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An offensive guard for Vince Lombardi's Packers, Jerry Kramer is the only member of the 75th Anniversary Team to not be enshrined in Canton. Although its tough to statistically grade a guard, Kramer was a vital player for the Packers' dynasty. In the 1962 NFL Championship Game, Kramer was the MVP after kicking three field goals, and in 1967, his block at the end of the Ice Bowl gave the Packers a dramatic win over the Dallas Cowboys.

11. Mitch Richmond

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11. Mitch Richmond

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A member of Golden State's Run-TMC offense, Mitch Richmond was considered by some to be the best two-guard in the NBA behind Michael Jordan. Richmond averaged 21 points per game during his 14-year career, and won his lone NBA Championship with the 2001-02 Los Angeles Lakers. Richmond was also a member of Dream Team II in 1996.

10. Sidney Moncrief

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10. Sidney Moncrief

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Sidney Moncrief was a five-time All-NBA selection, and finished in the top eight in MVP voting five times, yet he has not been enshrined in Springfield. One of the greatest defensive two-guards of all-time, Moncrief was a two-time Defensive Player of the Year, yet his inability to reach the NBA Finals may be the reason why he has not been elected yet.

9. Jack Morris

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9. Jack Morris

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Jack Morris pitched for four World Series champions on three different teams, and has 254 career wins, but his name continues to be excluded from Cooperstown. Morris was a five-time All-Star, and was one of the best pitchers in the 1980s, as he pitched the most games, innings, and having the most wins of any pitcher in that decade.

8. Spencer Haywood

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8. Spencer Haywood

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Spencer Haywood was the first superstar the Seattle SuperSonics ever had, and his leadership helped establish the success that the Sonics would later have in the late 1970s. With the Sonics, Haywood was a four-time All-Star two-time All-NBA First Team selection. Haywood helped lead the Sonics to their first postseason berth in 1974-75, and his No. 24 was retired by the team.

7. Tim Brown

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7. Tim Brown

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In his very first NFL game, Tim Brown returned a kickoff 97 yards for a touchdown, and over 17 seasons, mainly with the Oakland Raiders, Brown was one of the most prolific receivers of All-Time. At the time of his retirement, Brown ranked fifth in career receptions (1,094), sixth in receiving yards (14,934) and seventh in touchdowns (100).

6. Charles Haley

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6. Charles Haley

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Charles Haley's five Super Bowl wins is the most any player, and holds the record for career sacks in the Super Bowl, yet his relationship with the media is why he is not in Canton. During his career with the San Francisco 49ers and Dallas Cowboys, Haley recorded 100.5 career sacks, 26 forced fumbles, and shifted the balance of power in the 1990s from San Francisco to Dallas.

5. Mark McGwire

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5. Mark McGwire

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Mark McGwire was a 12-time All-Star with the Oakland Athletics and St. Louis Cardinals. He saved the game of baseball in 1998, but he will never be enshrined due to suspected PED use. With Oakland, McGwire teamed with Jose Canseco to give the A's a World Series championship in 1989. In St. Louis, McGwire broke Roger Maris' single-season home run record with 70, bringing back the national past-time from the 1994 Player Strike.

4. Marvin Harrison

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4. Marvin Harrison

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Marvin Harrison retired in 2008 with the second-most receptions in NFL history, yet he was not enshrined as a first-ballot Hall of Famer like he should have. Harrison was as consistent as could be, as he was named to eight Pro Bowls and caught a league-record 143 passes in 2002. Harrison also has the hardware to show for it as he helped the Colts win Super Bowl XLI against the Chicago Bears.

3. Roger Clemens

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3. Roger Clemens

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Roger Clemens won 354 games during his career, seven Cy Young Awards and struck out over 4,000 batters. Yet he will never be enshrined due to suspected PED use, but he should. Clemens was the AL MVP in 1986, an 11-time All-Star and was selected to MLB's All-Century Team. Clemens also completed the pitching triple crown twice and was a five-time strikeout champion among his many on-field accomplishments.

2. Barry Bonds

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2. Barry Bonds

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Barry Bonds is MLB's All-Time home run king (sorry baseball purists), yet he will never be enshrined in Cooperstown due to his combative nature and suspected PED use. Bonds was a seven-time NL MVP, a 14-time All-Star and an eight-time Gold Glove winner. Bonds holds many other MLB records, including most career home runs (762), most home runs in a single season (73), and most career walks (2,558), 688 of which were intentional.

1. Pete Rose

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1. Pete Rose

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Pete Rose is easily the biggest Hall of Fame snub, even though his actions alone prevent him from even being considered for election. Rose surpassed Ty Cobb to become the MLB's All-Time hits leader with 4,256, and he even was part of three World Series championship teams. After being banned from baseball for betting on games, Rose finally admitted to his transgressions more than 15 years later, but has not been reinstated by baseball.