10 Professional Athletes Who Would Make Better Coaches

10 Professional Athletes Who Would Make Even Better Coaches

Knicks Phil Jackson
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Phil Jackson is the epitome of what it means for an athlete to have a better coaching career than they did as a player. Some people are just born leaders, and these ten professional athletes are great candidates to do the same.

10. Danny Granger

Clippers Danny Granger
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10. Danny Granger

Clippers Danny Granger
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Granger has been a solid NBA player since breaking into the league in 2005 with the Indiana Pacers. The small-forward has never overwhelmed statistically, but is a balanced player who learned to be a leader as his career progressed. It was evident the Pacers missed his veteran presence after trading him to the Los Angeles Clippers during the season. He is a good player, but would make a great coach.

9. Jose Molina

Rays Jose Molina
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9. Jose Molina

 Rays Jose Molina
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Molina has never been a great offensive player during his career, but the catcher was a beloved and important part of two World Series winning teams; sharing catching duties for both the 2002 Los Angeles Angels, and 2009 New York Yankees. Now with Tampa Bay, Molina is on the back-nine of his career, but it wont take him long to find a job in the league as a manager.

8. Matt Hasselbeck

Matt Hasselbeck Seahawks
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8. Matt Hasselbeck

Seahawks Matt Hasselbeck
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Hasselbeck knows hard work, as it took him five years to win a starting quarterback job in the NFL after backing up for both the Green Bay Packers, and Seattle Seahawks. Hasselbeck's 10-year run in Seattle was highlighted by an NFC Championship and Super Bowl appearance during the 2005-06 season. He now is backup and tutor to Andrew Luck in Indianapolis, which is a perfect prerequisite for a coaching job in the future.

7. Jason Varitek

Red Sox Jason Varitek
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7. Jason Varitek

Red Sox Jason Varitek
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Former Boston Red Sox catcher and captain Jason Varitek had a 15-season long career behind the plate, all with Boston, and led his team to two World Series Championships. Varitek worked so well with big-name, and big-ego pitchers along the way, and has always been lauded as a true leader who would make for an even better manager if he chose to take that path.

6. Jerricho Cotchery

Steelers Jerricho Cotchery
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6. Jerricho Cotchery

 Steelers Jerricho Cotchery
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Cotchery had an underrated run during his time with the New York Jets, and they undoubtedly missed the wideout's veteran presence when he was released after the 2010 season. Cotchery is beloved in Pittsburgh for helping to groom their receiving corps, and it would shock me if he does not go on to be an even more successful coach in the NFL or NCAA.

5. Paul Konerko

White Sox Paul Konerko
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5. Paul Konerko

 White Sox Paul Konerko
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Konerko joined the Chicago White Sox in 1999 after bouncing around a bit during his first few seasons in MLB. Since then, he has produced a borderline hall of fame career with over 400 HRs, and led his team to a 2005 World Series title. He is one of the most underrated, beloved, and heralded players of his generation, and if he decides to pursue a managing career after retirement -- he will be even more successful.

4. Chad Pennington

New York Jets Chad Pennington
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4. Chad Pennington

New York Jets Chad Pennington
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The former Jets quarterback was far more known for his completion percentage and knowledge off the playbook than he was for arm-strength; but unfortunately, injuries derailed what could have been an incredibly efficient and productive career. NFL coaches and media alike boast about how qualified of a coaching candidate Pennington is, and it would be surprising if he does not get the chance to prove it.

3. Brian Urlacher

Chicago Bears Brian Urlacher
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3. Brian Urlacher

Chicago Bears Brian Urlacher
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Urlacher was a mainstay for more than a decade with the Chicago Bears' defense, and one day the linebacker will make a trip to Canton for the Hall-Of-Fame ceremonies. Urlacher was a fiery competitor, yet also displayed an ability to get the most out of the players around him, which is one of the most-needed traits in coaching. It is scary to think he could be an even better football coach than he was a player.

2. Jason Giambi

Cleveland Indians Jason Giambi
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2. Jason Giambi

Cleveland Indians Jason Giambi
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Giambi is in his 20th MLB season as a player, and although this year might be his last, do not expect him to be out of the game very long. Cleveland Indians' Manager Terry Francona raves that Giambi is one of best people suited to make the transition from player to manager that he has ever been associated with. Giambi is heavily respected inside the game, and will be an outstanding manager one day.

1. Derek Fisher

Derek FIsher Knicks
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1. Derek Fisher

Derek FIsher Knicks
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Fisher played 18 NBA seasons and has been one of the most respected players of his generation. He helped lead five Los Angeles Lakers' teams to championships, which is quite the accomplishment considering the egos of the players around him. He will need to use that experience during his new career as Coach of the New York Knicks, and while it is hard to see him winning five championships, Fisher will be a better coach than he was a player.

Timothy Downs is a sports writer for RantSports.com. You can add him on Google or follow on Twitter @Tidow1212.


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