Fantasy Football 2013: Draft Day Tips

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Don’t look now, but we are already in the month of June, which means Fantasy Football drafts will be in full swing before you even know it. With that being said, I thought I’d provide future fantasy owners with a few pieces of advice to better their overall roster. Of course, you should draft whichever way you feel fit, but offering my two cents certainly can’t hurt.

Right?

1) Please, please. Wait on drafting a quarterback

I don’t think we have ever seen the quarterback position as deep as it is in fantasy football this year. If you look back at last season, a whopping 21 fantasy signal callers posted at least 200 fantasy points. That is the most ever. In my eyes, there are 12 extremely viable starting options to choose from at the quarterback position. In a previous column, I separated them into four different tiers. Yes, elite guys like Aaron Rodgers and Drew Brees are awesome to have, but why not wait until Round 7 or 8 and grab a much, much more overlooked guy like Tony Romo or Andrew Luck. No, they don’t have the appeal of a Rodgers or Brady, but they throw the ball just as much, probably more. Not to mention they will flirt with 30 touchdowns and eclipse 4,000 yards. What do you get out of waiting on quarterback? Well, you get to stack up on running backs and wide receivers, giving yourself much more depth than your counterparts. I mean, considering that the running back position isn’t nearly as deep as in year’s past, it may be in your best interest come August. For more on this phenomenon, check out LateRoundQB. He kind of wrote an entire book on the situation and praises the strategy.

2) If you aren’t the first person to select a tight end, be the last

With Rob Gronkowski dealing with back issues, Jimmy Graham is the clear cut number one fantasy tight end coming into 2013. With that being said, he is worthy of a late second round draft pick, as long as you want to go for a tight end. Once Graham or Gronkowski are off the board, do not feel obligated to select your tight end until everyone else does? But what about Jason Witten and Tony Gonzalez? Sure, they too are terrific, but at the end of the day, tight end is an often streaming position. A terrific fantasy mind, C.D. Carter may be the biggest tight end streaming supporter out there. Here is a link to his in depth analysis.

3) Don’t take a defense until the last two picks… if it all

Trust me, this may seem like a no-brainer for the majority of you out there, but I can’t tell you how many times I have been in a draft and someone reaches on the Seahawks defense in the 8th or 9th round. That is absolutely unnecessary. Over the past few seasons, the defensive unit with the highest ADP never finished that close to the number one fantasy defense for that season. Like tight ends, you can also stream defenses very frequently and effectively. I mean, just spot start whoever plays the Jets every week. Kidding, Jets fans… but not really. Considering fantasy owners usually only own one defense, the waiver wire will be full of viable options week after week. Don’t waste an earlier pick on a defense when you still have work to do in terms of roster construction.

4) Avoid drafting too many players from same team                                                                                                                                                      

Take a look at a team like the Packers. Even with Greg Jennings out of the picture, this club still has three very fantasy relevant wide receivers in Randall CobbJordy Nelson and James Jones. Some fantasy players out there actually consider selecting all three of these guys, in attempts of securing touchdowns or any other fantasy production each week. However, this “strategy” isn’t very smart, as it will put you in a major hole when it comes to your bye week. You never want to have too much of your fantasy success depend on one team.

Adam Pfeifer is a featured fantasy sports columnist for Rant Sports.

You can follow him on Twitter @aPfeiferRS.


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