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Golf

Europe Wins The Ryder Cup

Joshua S Kelly-US Presswire

It was singles day in Chicago so quite simply anything could have happened and at the end of the day we could have seen the greatest event not only in golf but the history of sport.

The occasion is special  in the sport of golf and only takes place once every two years. What did happen was that Europe retained the Ryder Cup after sporting drama at it’s most gripping and intense. When the competition was decided  just one point separated the two sides.

Singles Sunday at the Ryder Cup is one of the greatest days in world sport and the drama yet again did not disappoint. The pure facts of the matter are that when Martin Kaymer (pictured) holed on the final green to beat Steve Stricker in the penultimate match Europe could not lose. Tiger Woods tied with Francesco Molinari which meant Europe had won the match by fourteen and a half to thirteen and a half points.

The Europeans wore navy blue in honour of Seve Ballesteros and that inspired them to come back from four points down ahead of play to win the Ryder Cup. A bookmaker based in the United Kingdom used a stunt pilot to write a 200 foot tweet with the words ‘Spirit of Seve’ to help the side.

A win for the visitors was one of the greatest achievements in the history of the sport. Despite a wonderful effort it looked  like excellence on the greens over the first two days would be crucial for the United States to avoid defeat. Most of the significant putts were holed to set up an amazing climax but an agonising defeat.

This great sporting drama will unfold again in two years at Gleneagles in Scotland. If Europe win that contest America will have lost six matches in seven.  However, the nucleus of the United States side should qualify again and veterans like Woods and Phil Mickelson will feel they can make the team.

After two hours of play on Sunday there was more blue than red on the leaderboard. Luke Donald did his job with a solid win over Bubba Watson in the first match. Ian Poulter justified his boast by beating Webb Simpson. The next three matches  were also won by Europe but the States started to have the better of things towards the middle of the day

However the pivotal moment came in the match between Sergio Garcia and Jim Furyk. The American missed a putt of about seven feet on the last hole which meant Garcia won the match. This was sport at it’s most compelling and the next match in Scotland  cannot come soon enough.