2013 Masters: Caddie Steve Williams Gave Adam Scott Correct Read on Winning Putt

After completing 72 holes at the Masters, Adam Scott headed into the clubhouse leading by one stroke. Angel Cabrera still had to play the 18th and forced a playoff with a birdie. Scott and Cabrera hit identical shots on the first playoff hole and both sunk par putts. Scott birdied the second playoff hole and became the first Australian to win the Masters.

In the press conference after the Masters, Scott told ESPN and the thousands if not millions people watching that he went with his caddies read instead of his own on the winning putt.

“Steve Williams gave me the read on that final putt. I was only going to give it 1 cup outside, and Williams said it was at least two.”

The big story here is that Scott listened to Steve Williams. Who knows, Scott could have gone with his own read and missed the birdie. As a result, Cabrera was set to make par and could have forced a third playoff. However, that didn’t happen and Scott won his first green jacket.

Williams is the former caddie of Tiger Woods and is familiar with Augusta National and the Masters. Tiger has won three Masters with Williams as caddie. He has now been a part of four winning Masters campaigns, and knows his golf. Scott listened to his caddie and is now celebrating the victory. We learned a very important lesson here: Sometimes it pays off to listen to other’s advice and change what we planned to do.

We will never know what would have happened if Scott would have putted based on his read. Most likely Scott would have missed the cup, and Cabrera and Scott would have headed to hole 18 for a third playoff hole. If I were a professional golfer, I would definitely listen to Williams and his experience, especially on a putt that decides the Masters. This was Williams’ 13th Major Title win as a caddie, which is the best all time.

Phil Naegely is a Soccer writer for RantSports.com. Like him on Facebook, follow him on Twitter @pnaegelyRS and add him to your circles on Google.


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