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MLB Washington Nationals

The Chien-Ming Wang Injury

Baseball players are among the greatest athletes in the world. It is debatable if they’re the greatest athletes in professional sports, as football, hockey, soccer, and basketball players all have their say in the argument as well. But certainly, professional baseball players are far superior athletes to you or I.

That being said, professional baseball players ought to be able to successfully execute putting one foot in front of the other. Especially in a Spring Training game.

Somewhere along the way, Chien-Ming Wang missed a step, both figuratively and literally. This, apparently, was caused by a left hamstring strain. I never endorse laughing at others, or finding humor in their failure. But for now, let’s take a moment to watch, and appreciate the fact that there may have been one athletic move we could have successfully completed when a professional baseball player failed.


It is worth noting that Wang either had the presence of mind, or the dumb luck of flailing his arms just right, to still be able to tag Russell Martin out as he went flailing over Wang.

This is made all the more unfortunate because Wang was pitching quite well in this game, and he has not been able to stay healthy for a full season since 2007. Wang was slated to be the 5th starter for the Washington Nationals to begin the 2012 season. These plans seem likely to either be delayed, or placed on hold entirely. John Lannan is expected to fill the vacated role by Wang, though Jim Bowden of ESPN tweeted yesterday that there may be another candidate in the mix:

[blackbirdpie url="https://twitter.com/#!/JimBowdenESPNxm/status/180448758931267584"]

As Ryan Gaydos wrote earlier this week for Rant Sports, Lannan had been drawing interest from several teams in the trade market. Now it appears those plans will need to be placed on hold, unless Bowden is correct and Detwiler is the pick for the Nationals’ new 5th starter. Either way, this is once again another tally for the age-old adage that a MLB team can never have too much pitching.