R.A. Dickey and New York Mets Will Appeal for No Hitter

It was understandably overshadowed by Matt Cain’s dominate perfect game performance, but R.A Dickey came very close to throwing the New York Mets second no hitter yesterday. He was so close, in fact, that the commissioner’s office will be reviewing the game’s only hit- a first inning infield single by B.J. Upton to determine if it was actually an error and not a hit. Former New York Yankees manager Joe Torre is the man in charge of the review process at the commissioner’s office and he expects to rule on the issue soon.

The odds are slim that MLB will overturn the official scorer’s ruling and award Dickey the no hitter, but the Mets feel it is worth a shot anyway. “We’re taking a stab,” manager Terry Collins said, “What do we have to lose?” For his part, Dickey was uneasy about the idea of a retroactively awarded no-hitter. “”Regardless of how you get it, it’s still a no-hitter,” the knuckleballer acknowledged before admitting,  “then a part of me thinks it would be cheap.”

The disputed play was a difficult ground ball that third baseman David Wright attempted to barehand in the first inning. B.J Upton hit a high chopper at Wright and with the speedy Upton running hard, Wright attempted to bare hand the ball to save time. He missed and the ball skipped off for what was ruled as an infield single. The Mets are now in the diffuclt position of asking for an error to be charged against their own player. In reviewing the play, Torre will consider the likelihood that the play would be made if the ball was fielded cleanly and the inherent difficulty involved. By ruling it a hit, the scorer has made the judgment that Wright should not be expected to make the play and it seems unlikely that that would change in review.

R.A. Dickey undisputedly broke the Mets club record for consecutive scoreless innings, passing Jerry Koosman’s 31.2 scoreless innings with eight scoreless frames before an unearned run in the ninth end the streak at 32.2 innings. Dickey now holds the fourth best ERA (2.20) in baseball and the eleventh best FIP (2.91). At 10-1 he also has the best record of any pitcher in the game. In the National League only Cain, Cole Hamels and Stephen Strasburg have struck out more hitters. As unlikely as it may have once seemed, at 37 years old, the Mets knuckleballer is one of the best pitchers in the game.

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