New York Yankees owner Hal Steinbrenner is destroying the proud franchise his father built

New York Yankees Hal Steinbrenner

Debby Wong-USA TODAY Sports

The New York Yankees have become cheap and picked a really bad time to do so. Not only have they become penny pinchers, but there is some question as to how much authority general manager Brian Cashman actually has anymore, with Yankees owner Hal Steinbrenner now at the top of the organization. Hal has a very different idea of how the Yankees should do business, much different than his late father, George Steinbrenner.

Hal cares about the team’s bottom line more than he does about putting a winning team on the field. It is pretty bad when one of the most disliked agents in sports, Scott Boras, makes fun of the Yankees, saying they are no longer the “Goliath of the Game.” He didn’t stop there; he also said that Cashman no longer has the power to call shots on his own, saying, “He really is not involved in a lot of dealing right now, but is doing due diligence to go back and meet with them about that. He had indicated that right now, he’s working with ownership on getting advance authority.”

Sources within the Yankees organization quickly denied the comments made by Boras saying, “What does Scott Boras know? Are you kidding me?”

Obviously Boras isn’t a man many members of management like, on any team, because he is someone who would seem to lose out the most if the Yankees continue to operate this way, but it doesn’t mean he is wrong.

It isn’t hard for fans to see what the Yankees have become and how times have changed. Yankees management, or sources, disregard Boras’ comments as it being just his way to get the team to spend, but the facts support his comments and the Yankees have changed, with it being the fans that will pay the most.

The Yankees have offered a few one-year contracts this offseason, while other teams were willing to pay less per year, but give players security with longer deals, and the Yankees lost out on them. This one-year contract idea isn’t working out, and everyone in baseball sees what they are doing, which gives other teams a big advantage.

The Yankees are offering a lot of money in one-year contracts because they have made it clear their financial intent for the 2014 season. Which brings up another question, what happens after 2014?

It is time for Yankees fans to stand up and scream, because Hal is headed toward running this proud, winning franchise into the ground. He is taking one of the most popular and valuable teams in all of sports, in addition to one of the most expensive for a fan to see, and turning them into the Miami Marlins.

This is all about Hal getting his wallet fatter more than it is about winning baseball games. Worse yet, he has put a leash on Cashman with making moves, then throws him under the bus, making it seem as if Cashman is the one making the calls when it comes to baseball.

After Boras’ comments, the organization came out and said it wasn’t that Cashman needed to come to anyone to make deals, it was that he just didn’t find the right guys for the right price. It is true that a lot of players were extremely overpaid compared to their worth by teams looking to fill holes, but to believe Cashman did not want to give just another year to a few players or even make relatively minor offers to players like Eric Chavez is completely absurd.

Cashman is being the company man saying all the right things, but what real choice does he have? He surely wants to keep his job.

Hal’s plan for the Yankees is a great plan for a business; no business wants to pay a tax if they don’t have to. But the Yankees are a sports team, a team with a winning tradition not some company on Wall Street. He will learn this quickly when no one is in those expensive seats.

The Yankees have been run like the ”Goliath of the Game” for too long to suddenly stop; if they do, they will be stuck with half a team, and that half is getting old.

The rumor of a player like Josh Hamilton coming to New York is about as real as Santa Claus; so if fans want to believe in both, that’s great, but neither is real.

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