Toronto Blue Jays: Has Brett Lawrie Gone too far this time?

Toronto Blue Jays' Brett Lawrie

Joy R. Absalon- US Presswire

The Toronto Blue Jays had their greatest comeback of the season when Munenori Kawasaki hit a two-out, two-run double in the bottom of the ninth inning, to beat the Baltimore Orioles 6-5 in dramatic fashion.

But sadly, it wasn’t all good news out of the Jays camp, as Brett Lawrie had another in-game meltdown, but this time it was directed at manager John Gibbons, who seemed to have had enough from his third basemen and called him out on it. If Lawrie continues to act unprofessionally, what should the Jays do with him for the rest of the season?

It all happened in the ninth inning when the Jays were mounting their three-run comeback against the Orioles. Lawrie went up to bat with with no outs and a chance to cut into the deficit, and hit what looked like a sac fly into right field. But when Nick Markakis caught the ball, Adam Lind didn’t feel it was deep enough for him to score.

On the way back to the dugout, Lawrie was yelling in Lind’s direction when Gibbons noticed and began to yell back at Lawrie. Jose Bautista got in the middle and separated the two before anything else could be said.

When the Jays completed the comeback, Lawrie was the first to lead the charge onto the field to celebrate with his teammates, but did he go too far this time?

This season has not been what the Jays have expected it to be as they sit last place in the AL East, but one factor that continues to be a recurring theme is the attitude of Lawrie. He was ejected in Friday’s game for tossing his bat and gloves in the direction of the home plate umpire, and he’s been a hothead all year long.

It’s sometimes okay to act the way he does if he’s playing great baseball, but that’s just not the case with Lawrie as he is having a bad season at the plate. He’s batting .199 with just 14 RBIs, and with his latest outburst has many experts thinking that when Jose Reyes comes back to the team, he could find himself in Buffalo, while Kawasaki could take his place at third.

It’s one thing to play with passion, but he’ll have to change his attitude and play at the plate if he wants to stay in the majors.

Follow Blue Jays Writer Robert Johnson on Twitter@robert337733

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