Philadelphia Phillies: The Effect On Carlos Ruiz Using A Banned Substance

Eric Hartline-USA TODAY Sports

Yesterday, MLB made a statement about the use of illegal substances in the game of baseball, suspending Ryan Braun of the Milwaukee Brewers for the remaining of the season including the playoffs. It shows how making one bad decision can change your career.

Philadelphia PhilliesCarlos Ruiz also had an experience with a banned substance, being found guilty of using Adderall this past offseason. Adderall is a substance used for people that have an attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Athletes are actually allowed to use the substance if they have a document from a doctor, but Ruiz did not.

It is unclear when Ruiz had started to use Adderall, but his numbers certainly tell the story. Last season, Ruiz hit .325 with 68 RBIs, along with 16 home runs. He was unstoppable. Ruiz had also had the honor of being an All-Star for the National League. It was a season he would never forget. Unfortunately, it was also one that should not have counted.

Ruiz was suspended for 25 games to start the 2013 season. When he was able to come back, he did not perform up to his standards and landed on the disabled list. After his stint on the DL, he is still not performing like last year. It shows how the Adderall has affected Ruiz in his performance.

The catcher is hitting .257 with only has seven RBIs, and has not hit a home run yet this season. He only has four extra base hits, and the Philadelphia fans are witnessing a Ruiz that they are not used to seeing.

The veteran had gone through his punishment from the league. However, it seems like he will be going through his own personal issues for a long time. He will have to find a way to get his offense back naturally. The Phillies are expecting him to continue to be their starting catcher. For that to happen, he needs to be able to contribute offensively.

MLB is cracking down on their drug policy. They are not letting anyone get away with anything anymore. It is good for the players who do not use substances, and bad the players who do. These new polices are going to change baseball for the better.

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