Miami Marlins’ Mike Redmond Handled Jose Fernandez Situation Perfectly

Jose Fernandez Miami Marlins

Steve Mitchell-USA TODAY Sports

The National League got to see the final start of their rookie of the year on Wednesday night. I truly believe that Jose Fernandez has done more to deserve the honor than any other rookie, just edging Julio Teheran and Yasiel Puig. Unfortunately that isn’t what people are talking about the day following Fernandez’s last outing as a rookie. The drama following his childish home run glare is the talk of the town instead. All things considered, the way Miami Marlins manager Mike Redmond handled it should make it over and done.

All game long they got to see the issue with Fernandez being in control of his final game of the season. He was pumped up and having fun but during the sixth inning he went wrong when he began almost taunting the Atlanta Braves when they hit hard outs. First of all he doesn’t get to brag about a great play that saved a double; he should only tip his cap and point his glove to the fielder that saved him. As with other things he did wrong on this night, Fernandez will learn better.

I think the best of this situation was the way Redmond handled it. He wasn’t upset at the Braves for one single second because he knew full well what they were reacting to. It was completely and totally Fernandez’s fault. Redmond knew why Evan Gattis stared for a second at his home run and why Chris Johnson spoke to Fernandez after his loud out.

All Redmond did was get his pitcher out of the situation by nearly shoving him back towards the dugout. Once they were back in the clubhouse, Fernandez was allowed to know just how childish what he did was. Redmond set up a time for him to apologize to the Braves’ Mike Minor and Brian McCann personally which to his credit, the rookie did honestly and like a stand-up young man.

The only way this thing goes bad now is if the Braves retaliate on Thursday. Redmond ended it and Fernandez took all the blame and apologized publicly. It is completely over and anything done now with the baseball against the Marlins would be one hundred percent wrong by the Braves and in fact childish. Everyone should give a cap-tip to Redmond for this. He has done more than any manager in recent memory to defuse a tough situation and he did it like a champ.

David Miller is a Senior Writer for RantSports.com. Follow him on Twitter @davidmillerrant, “Like” him on Facebook or add him to your network on Google

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Around the Web

  • brianmartin

    Are you Chris Johnson’s mother?

    How can you excuse his juvenile behavior that started it and escalated it?

  • Eric McAlpin

    Is this a real article?

    Baseball players and the whole “disrespecting the game” thing and “don’t show up the other team” attitude sounds like something from little league. It is the most tired, ancient viewpoint in sports. These are grown men, not kids trying not to hurt other people’s feelings.

    If they don’t like it, don’t let him hit a home run. Or don’t let him strike you out.

    The Braves are in first place. Why would they care that a rookie pitcher from a last place team hit a home run off them?

    And Redmond looks like a fool for not backing his player up.

    • Alex Stepanyk

      EXACTLY!

  • Alex Stepanyk

    You are DEAD WRONG. Redmond is an idiot throwing his best player under the bus like that, acting like what Fernandez did was the crime of the century, saying he “ruined” the game for him. He is about to LOSE 100 games and Fernandez has been just about the team’s only bright spot. The Braves’ Evan Gattis & Chris Johnson started the low class garbage that instigated the entire incident, and Redmond said nothing about that, choosing instead to rip his star rookie pitcher. I had very little respect for Redmond’s managing this year; yeah, the team is short on talent thanks to the idiot owner, but Redmond showed little managerial flair or ability to make lemonade out of the lemons he was given.