What Should New York Mets Do With Arbitration Eligible Players?

1 of 11

What Should New York Mets Do With Arbitration Eligible Players?

g
The Star-Ledger - USATODAY Sports

There are two teams that are lucky enough to still be playing baseball, but for the other 28 teams, the MLB offseason awaits. Teams can’t officially do anything or make any moves until the World Series ends, but they are able to deliberate amongst themselves and come to decisions about what they will try to do once the offseason officially gets underway. One of the first steps in the baseball offseason is deciding whether or not to tender contracts to arbitration eligible players and then try to reach agreements with those players before going to arbitration.

This offseason, the New York Mets have 10 players that are eligible for arbitration. For a few of those players, the decision will be fairly easy as to whether or not to offer them arbitration and bring them back for the 2014 season, but for most of the players it won’t be so easy. The Mets are at a bit of a crossroads with many of their players, as they are ready to become legitimate competitors next season and can no longer afford to wait while players audition for spots; they need to know now who they’re going to move forward with and who they’re going to let go.

The Mets’ situation is also complicated by the fact that their 40-man roster is overloaded, which will force them to cut ties with more players than they ordinarily would. Being in a roster bind like this will affect the decisions the Mets make with regard to offering arbitration eligible players a contract for next season, as not offering them is an easy way to free up a spot on the roster. With all that in mind, let’s take a look at what the Mets should do with each of the 10 arbitration eligible players on their roster.

Bryan Zarpentine is a New York Mets writer at RantSports.com. Like him on Facebook, follow him on twitter @BZarp and add him on Google.

2 of 11

Scott Atchison, Non-Tender

g
Steve Mitchell - USATODAY Sports

Atchison did a fine job for the Mets this season, at least when he was healthy, but he’s among the bullpen arms they shouldn’t bring back in 2014. He’s still effective and throws hard, but he’s old and he has elbow issues meaning i’s highly likely that he’ll find his way to the disabled list again next year. The Mets need to get younger in their bullpen, and getting rid of Atchison is an easy way to do that.

3 of 11

Dillon Gee, Tender

h
Brad Penner - USATODAY Sports

This is an easy decision. Despite missing the second half of 2012 and getting off to a slow start this year, Gee was great in the second half of 2013 and looks to be establishing himself as a solid back-of-the-rotation starter. Along with Jon Niese and Zack Wheeler, the Mets will rely on Gee next season and expect him to take the ball every fifth day.

4 of 11

Bobby Parnell, Tender

g
Brad Penner - USATODAY Sports

The Mets are hopeful that Parnell will be recovered from neck surgery by spring training after the injury cost him the final two months of the 2013 season. Parnell could be a trade chip, as other teams have been asking about him for years, but with the injury his value is down, so the Mets will likely keep him. Assuming he’s healthy, he’ll be their closer in 2014.

5 of 11

Ike Davis, Tender and Trade

h
Brad Penner - USATODAY Sports

Davis is due to make quite a lot of money next season, despite his poor performance the last two seasons, but the Mets can’t afford to non-tender him and get nothing in return. He has tantalizing power and is a plus defensive player at first base, which means some team will take a chance on him and hope that a change of scenery solves his issues. The Mets might as well use him as a trade chip to get something in return, but that requires tendering a contract to him even though he’ll be grossly overpaid.

6 of 11

Daniel Murphy, Tender

jr
Howard Smith - USATODAY Sports

There’s no doubt the Mets will tender a contract to Murphy, although they will be open to trading him. He’s at the peak of his value, so he could bring something substantial in a trade if the Mets have a way of replacing him at second base. But if they don’t get what they want, the Mets will have no problem keeping him at second base in 2014.

7 of 11

Omar Quintanilla, Non-Tender

h
Howard Smith - USATODAY Sports

Quintanilla is little more than a replacement player, and considering the state of their 40-man roster, there’s no way they can keep him. The Mets would be open to bringing him back on a minor league contract, which is what they’ve done with him the past two seasons, but there’s no way the Mets guarantee him a major league contract and a roster spot.

8 of 11

Ruben Tejada, Tender and Trade

g
Anthony Gruppuso - USATODAY Sports

Tejada will be a non-tender candidate, but in the end he’s only 24 years old and already has over 300 games of major league experience. It’s too hard for a team to walk away from that, but expect the Mets to explore other options at shortstop and try to shop Tejada to see if there are any takers for him.

9 of 11

Justin Turner, Non-Tender

y
Brad Penner - USATODAY Sports

The Mets will likely end up offering Turner arbitration, but they shouldn’t. With the roster issues they have, he really isn’t an essential part of their roster. He’ll come cheap, which will ultimately help him, but the Mets should consider letting go of Turner.

10 of 11

Lucas Duda, Tender and Trade

u
Brad Penner - USATODAY Sports

Duda has too much power for the Mets to give up on him, but that doesn’t mean they won’t try to trade him. The Mets will have to choose between Duda and Ike Davis, so it’s quite possible the Mets tender him a contract and then trade him, most likely to an American League team where he can play first base or be a designated hitter.

11 of 11

Eric Young, Tender

y
Anthony Gruppuso - USATODAY Sports

Young was a significant contributor to the Mets after they traded for him midseason, and unless the Mets find speed or a leadoff hitter somewhere else, they’re going to need to tender him a contract and bring him back in 2014.

Around the Web