Atlanta Braves Make Classy Move To Ban Sunglasses On Hats

Jason Heyward

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There are teams around the world that forbid their players from doing certain things, stated either in their contract or known as the player joins the team. One of the most famous cases is for the New York Yankees: You aren’t allowed to have facial hair of any kind.

The Atlanta Braves have reportedly taken a step like this, making a “rule” of sorts that forbids players from putting their sunglasses on the bill of their caps. Scott Miller, a former CBSSports.com baseball writer, tweeted the news out just a few days ago:

“Love that the #Braves forbid sunglasses resting on caps above bill over logo. Organizational respect of logo. #Classy”  – Scott Miller (@ScottMillerBbl)

In 110 percent agreement, the news should spread some sign of respect toward the Braves’ front office, management or coaches (whichever decided on the idea). It would be a very good idea for the rest of the league to take notice of this and hopefully fall in line.

The team is showing great respect to the organization itself and respecting their logo. However, more than their logo, they don’t want their players covering up the team that they represent. The players should have no problem with this, because their team is paying them a lot of money so it shouldn’t be an issue.

There’s absolutely nothing wrong with the players having their sunglasses out on the field, but is there anything more frustrating that looking out on the field on a bright, sunny day and six of the nine fielders have sunglasses… on the bills of their hats? Or even more, during a night game, players still have their shades on their hats when there’s clearly no use for them at any time for the rest of the game.

There are solutions to this “problem.” First off, if they’re not going to wear their shades, they could try something like leaving them in their locker or hand them to one of the 20 assistants in the dugout to hold onto for them. That won’t happen, seeing that MLB players are more concerned with their fashion sense on the field instead of playing the game 100 mph.

The second option could be to go out and buy a pair of the flip down sunglasses. They never have to leave their head, and if they don’t need them, just flip them up until the situation arises where a lazy fly ball sits right in the sun. The fashion score on this is well below five out of ten, but functionality rates a strong nine.

The last option could be maybe wearing them on the back of their caps. Some players have already begun to do this, but there’s a problem here. Considering an outfielder does this, and, surprise, has to run down a fly ball, the shades are probably coming off of the hat and that just wouldn’t look cool, now would it?

The Braves are smart here. The players should figure out something to do with their sunglasses other than using them as a fashion statement. Expect the team to lead the league this year with sunglasses actually worn correctly or sunglasses worn on the back of the hat. But we won’t miss the logo, because it really shouldn’t be covered. Be proud of who you play for and don’t cover it.

Steven Whitaker is an Atlanta Braves writer for Rantsports.com. Follow him on Twitter @CoachStevenWhit, “Like” him on Facebook or add him to your circles on Google

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  • Nathan

    This is ridiculous. We know what team they play for already, what do we care how they wear their sunglasses. This is 100% opinion and not as clear cut as the author makes it seem. What if the Atlanta braves wanted players to wear logos on their sleeves and started to ban a player’s gloves that were too big and covered the logo?… what if a necklace covered the chest logo on the jersey too much that it was a distraction and the Braves banned all necklaces….I think the author should be thinking more about the practicality and possible repercussions of the situation, and get over the money aspect…. also, author, dont forget those HUGE LOGOS on the jerseys that everyone can see, its not like people will be confused who is playing.

  • Deion Sanders

    Worst rule ever. And Steven you need to wake the hell up about trying to justify this.