5 Current Milwaukee Brewers With Franchise-Best Seasons

5 Current Milwaukee Brewers with Franchise-Best Feats

Miller Park Yount Statue
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The Milwaukee Brewers were officially born in 1970 upon moving to the Cream City from Seattle. While their history doesn't matchup with many of the oldest clubs -- in terms of wins, players or records -- the Brewers have had a number of phenomenal talents who posted terrific seasons.

Though much of the success came in the distant past, there are actually five current members of the Brewers who own a franchise-best season in their back pockets.

5. Aramis Ramirez - Third Baseman OPS

Aramis Ramirez Milwaukee Brewers
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5. Aramis Ramirez - Third Baseman OPS

Aramis Ramirez Milwaukee Brewers
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Aramis Ramirez is the only Brewers' third baseman to have a season with a .900 OPS. That came in 2012 when he hit 50 doubles and 27 home runs. Tommy Harper fell just short, posting an .899 OPS in the Crew's first season.

4. Jonathan Lucroy - Catcher Power

Jonathan Lucroy Milwaukee Brewers
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4. Jonathan Lucroy - Catcher Power

Jonathan Lucroy Milwaukee Brewers
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The current Milwaukee backstop is the only catcher in club history with 15 or more home runs to go with at least a .790 OPS. Lucroy hit 18 dingers en route to a .795 OPS in 2013. Ted Simmons was the only other catcher on pace, falling short on home runs while producing a .799 OPS and driving in 108 runs.

3. Yovani Gallardo - Dominant Pitching

Yovani Gallardo Milwaukee Brewers
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3. Yovani Gallardo - Dominant Pitching

Yovani Gallardo Milwaukee Brewers
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Yovani Gallardo is the only pitcher in Brewers' history to strike out 200 batters and hold opponents to .225 batting average or lower in the same season. Yo accomplished the feat in 2009 with 204 punch outs, while batters hit just .219 against him.

2. Ryan Braun - All-Around Run Production

Ryan Braun Milwaukee Brewers
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2. Ryan Braun - All-Around Run Production

Ryan Braun Milwaukee Brewers
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In team history, Milwaukee's 2011 NL MVP is the only player to record 100 runs, 100 RBIs and 20 stolen bases in the same season. Ryan Braun has actually done it on three separate occasions, accomplishing the feat in 2009, 2011 and 2012. He also led the league in hits in 2009 with 203 that year.

1. Carlos Gomez - Power-Speed Combo

Carlos Gomez Milwaukee Brewers
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1. Carlos Gomez - Power-Speed Combo

Carlos Gomez Milwaukee Brewers
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In 2013, Carlos Gomez became the only player in franchise history to record at least 20 home runs, 20 doubles and 40 stolen bases in a single season (24-27-40), which he executed in 2013. Paul Molitor had enough steals and doubles in three separate years, but was short on the long ball, hitting 19, 16 and 15, respectively, in those seasons.

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  • Scott

    Ben Sheets in 2004 struck out 264 with an OBA of .223. Higura came within a couple K’s of matching that in 1988.

    Yount(one of the truly most under appreciated greats of all time) had 2 seasons in which he was either 1 RBI or one SB away from 100/100/20 and 3 seasons in total in which he was very close.

    Rare for a SS back then. HE was the guy who broke the mold at SS, not Cal Ripken. Yount hit 29 HR’s in his first MVP year and 20 of them were on the road as County Stadium was such a pitchers park. In fact, something like 140 of that teams 216 HR’s came in the same game.

    The MOST glaring and obvious mistake(I didn’t bother to go back and check what Don Money did, or what others did year by year) that stuck out like a sore thumb was your claim that ARam was the only Brewers 3rd basemen to post a .900 OPS.

    Did you recall what position Ryan Braun played as a rookie? He had a truly historic rookie season slugging over .630 and posting a OPS over 1.000. Molitor also had a OPS well over .900 in 1987 playing a great deal of his time at 3rd base, though I didn’t look at his splits.

    Missing Ryan Braun though…that’s a big one.

  • Tim Muma

    I appreciate your research. I want to reiterate the focus was on current players who hold these distinctions. Unfortunately, due to the limits placed on me in terms of words/characters, I can’t address every player who was close. So mentioning Yount or Higuera would’ve been accurate as being so close, but they didn’t reach those exact stats and I chose to mention something else.

  • Tim Muma

    Ben Sheets actually allowed an average of .226 in 2004, so he was not below .225 as was the criteria I mentioned for Gallardo

  • Tim Muma

    As far as 3B, had I been given more space, I would have noted that to qualify at a position, it is standard to have played the position in 75% of team games. Braun played in 70% that year at 3B and Molitor did not reach 75% either. Other candidates may not have qualified due to too few plate appearances.

  • Tim Muma

    Don Money never had an OPS of .900