Miguel Cabrera’s $300 Million Deal Bad For Baseball

Cabrera

Rick Osentoski-USA TODAY Sports

$100 million? $200 million? How high can this thing go? Apparently, the sky is the limit. Reports out of Detroit are that Miguel Cabrera and the Detroit Tigers have reached an agreement on a deal reported at just under $300 million. This, of course, is in line with the projections and shows where we are in the MLB when it comes to player salaries. It’s time to stop the madness.

It’s not that Cabrera isn’t worth it — he definitely is. Cabrera enters this season on the heels of back-to-back seasons with at least 40 long balls. He could even eclipse 500 home runs this year. Signing a guy like that comes at a steep price in the MLB. Guys like Alex Rodriguez, Albert Pujols and Robinson Cano have made serious coin over a travesty of management.

With no cap on salaries, teams have to break the bank and at what cost? The players of course are content and seemingly, the owners are okay with the salaries too. But too often, the MLB rewards players with back-loaded contracts that don’t reward what the player does now. Instead, the mega contracts take a player well into his mid 30′s and at times, coming on the heels of decline.

Pujols would know all about that. Some argue Cano is next, but he has company now, and that’s Cabrera. And really, it’s not about the talent — Cabrera is worth every penny. Besides, if a team wants to spend the GDP of 42 nations on me for a multi-year deal, I would ask race for a pen too. But still, deep down, I hope the MLB puts a rein on these contracts and gets some parity among its teams.

The MLB can push how many different teams that have won the World Series as proof that the system works, but there’s still cracks and leaks in the framework. A good start would be a salary cap.

Karim Akbar is a Sacramento Kings columnist for Rant Sports. For more Sacramento Kings news, “Like” his page on Facebook, follow him on Twitter @Kuhreem, or add him to your network on Google+.

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  • Tim Leonard

    What are the cracks and leaks? Outside of the writer’s hysterical rant about the sky falling, this article is remarkably devoid on pretty much every level.