MLB Boston Red Sox

Clay Buchholz Continues To Frustrate Boston Red Sox Fans

Clay Buchholz

Kim Klement-USA TODAY Sports

Will the real Clay Buchholz please stand up?

Heading into the 2014 season, the Boston Red Sox had their rotation locked in. Jon Lester, Jake Peavy, John Lackey, Felix Doubrant and a supposedly healthy Buchholz would round out the rotation. All five pitchers, although not dominating, were good enough that the Red Sox shouldn’t have to worry about their starters. Buchholz was coming off a strange 2013. A year that when healthy, he completely dominated. In 16 starts, Buchholz was an incredible 12-1 with a 1.74 ERA. One more time, 12-1 with a 1.74 ERA. Who did he think he was? Pedro Martinez? The issue with Pedro….I mean Buchholz, was the injuries robbed the team of a potential history-making season.

Somehow, someway, a sore neck sidelined Buchholz for three months. Three months! This “injury” really put a sour taste in the mouths of Red Sox fans because, quite frankly, we wanted to see the kid flourish and have a phenomenal season. In the game of baseball, you can never have enough pitching. Having a healthy, dominating Buchholz could have really been a nice storyline to go with the World Series win. However, the problem with playing in Boston is fans remember things. This wasn’t something fans would easily forget. I mean, even 15 years later, fans still talk about how former outfielder Carl Everett didn’t believe in dinosaurs.

As the 2014 season progresses, Buchholz seems to be heading in the opposite direction. In eight starts so far, Buchholz owns a 6.17 ERA. In three of those starts, Buchholz has given up six runs. In the months of April and September of last year, Buchholz gave up five runs total in each of those months. It’s amazing to think that we’re watching the same pitcher take the hill. Questions about his durability and mental toughness are creeping their way into conversations about our lost pitcher.

I’m honestly at a loss as to what the issue with Buchholz is. He has the talent, he’s only 29 years old, so what gives? I wonder if the Red Sox made a trade for a starting pitcher, would Buchholz be the one to lose his spot. What would you do with Buchholz? Regulate him to mop up duty in the bullpen? Make him a setup man? Send him to the minors (highly unlikely)? I truly am puzzled.  I want the “Pedro Buchholz” to come back. Not this guy in a Red Sox uniform who throws batting practice during games for opposing teams.

Will the real Clay Buchholz please stand up?

Follow Steve Buchanan on Twitter-@Sbuchanan24