5 Reasons Why Philadelphia Phillies’ Dick Allen Should Be In The Hall Of Fame

5 Reasons Why Philadelphia Phillies' Dick Allen Should Be In The Hall Of Fame

Dick Allen, Philadelphia Phillies,
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Whether you know him by Dick Allen or Richie Allen, or were a fan of his when he played for the Philadelphia Phillies and the Chicago White Sox in separate stints, a strong case can be made that Allen's omission from the Baseball Hall of Fame could be the biggest injustice of the modern era. Here are five reasons why.

5. Hit Longest Homers of His Day

Dick Allen, Philadelphia Phillies,
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5. Hit Longest Homers of His Day

Dick Allen, Philadelphia Phillies,
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Mickey Mantle of the Yankees was known for hitting long homers at the time, but no one hit them quite as far as Allen. Old Connie Mack Stadium in Philadelphia had two decks in left field and Allen not only hit homers over the second deck, but also over the 30-foot advertising billboard on top of the second deck. He was also only one of two players in history to hit it out over the right field scoreboard.

4. Proved Greatness in a Pitcher’s Era

Dick Allen, Philadelphia Phillies,
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4. Proved His Greatness in a Pitcher’s Era

Dick Allen, Philadelphia Phillies,
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When Allen played, pitchers like Sandy Koufax, Warren Spahn, Juan Marichal and Gaylord Perry regularly won over 20 games. Heck, even Denny McLain, a guy nowhere as good, won 30 games once. Today’s hitters do not have to face pitchers like that. With the Chicago White Sox, Allen not only led the AL in homers but was the league’s MVP.

3. Impact As Rookie

Dick Allen, Philadelphia Phillies,
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3. Impact As Rookie

Dick Allen, Philadelphia Phillies,
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Three years from having the worst record in MLB, the Phillies were single-handedly carried by Allen to first place for most of the 1964 season. Allen batted .431 in April with five home runs. For the season, Allen batted .318 with 29 home runs and 91 RBIs. He led the NL in runs scored (125), triples (13), extra-base hits (80), and total bases (352), and he won the NL Rookie of the Year award.

2. Dominated the NL for 3 Years

Dick Allen, Philadelphia Phillies,
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2. Dominated the NL for 3 Years

Dick Allen, Philadelphia Phillies,
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From 1965 through 1967, Allen made three-straight All-Star teams. He hit .308 during that span, averaging 27 home runs, 90 RBIs, and 15 stolen bases per season. His adjusted OPS for those three years was 166. Willie Mays, the 1965 MVP, had an adjusted OPS of 154. Roberto Clemente, the NL MVP in 1966, posted a 150 and 1967 MVP Orlando Cepeda notched a 144.

1. The Company He Kept

Dick Allen, Philadelphia Phillies,
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1. The Company He Kept

Dick Allen, Philadelphia Phillies,
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Allen was a career .292/.534/.378 hitter, with a higher career slugging average than Mel Ott, Mike Schmidt and Ty Cobb. If those guys are in, Allen should be too. Most of Schmidt's homers landed in the first row of the lower deck, while most of Allen's were over the top of the scoreboard on the second deck. Willie Stargell, another great player of the era, said it best about Allen: "When he hits a home run, there's no souvenir.”

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