Grady Sizemore Experiment Has Failed For The Boston Red Sox

Grady Sizemore

Steve Mitchell-USA TODAY Sports

The Grady Sizemore experiment has come to an end in Boston. Today, the Boston Red Sox announced they have designated Sizemore for assignment, a move that, according to most Red Sox fans, was a long time coming. Sizemore has struggled mightly since Spring Training and couldn’t get a good streak going. Now, his future in baseball is uncertain.

Was the idea of bringing Sizemore onto the Red Sox a bad move? Absolutely not! Major League teams take fliers on players every year. The problem with this one was that Sizemore was really being hyped during Spring Training. It gave us that sense that maybe we really hit the jackpot with Sizemore and he would end up being a productive player for dirt cheap money, something teams hope to get every year. Sizemore ending Spring with a .310 average, one home run two RBIs and a .356 batting average. Those aren’t spectacular numbers, but they’re good enough to think that this would be a great bat to have in the Red Sox lineup.

It will be interesting to see where Sizemore ends up. If he clears waivers, which I feel like could be possible, he could end up in the minor leagues. This would be great for the Red Sox to have that depth. Even though they seem to be playing anyone that wears a glove in the outfield this year, if Sizemore can figure it out in the minors, I’d welcome him back to the major league level. The kid has talent, and it’s shown from his prior years. He just hasn’t gotten back in the groove yet.

The other factor could be if Jackie Bradley Jr. continue to struggle. He isn’t exactly lighting the world on fire either. Shane Victorino is also nearing his return so the outfield is going to suddenly become crowded in Boston. Bradley Jr. isn’t exactly doing himself any favors by batting .205 with one home run and 22 RBIs. Change are coming and they’re coming fast.

No matter what happens, the Sizemore experiment has failed thus far. It will just be a matter of time before we know if it failed completely, or it failed the first time around.

Follow Steve Buchanan on Twitter and Facebook.

Around the Web