Ranking the Toronto Blue Jays’ Top 10 Prospects Heading Into 2015

By Drew Jenkins

Ranking the Toronto Blue Jays’ Top 10 Prospects Heading Into 2015

Toronto Blue Jays
Jerome Miron- USA TODAY Sports

The Toronto Blue Jays finally showed signs of life in 2014. While they still missed the playoffs, they will return a majority of their team in 2015, and things are looking up for the club for the first time in years. A big reason for that is a strong farm system that features multiple potential impact players. Here's a look at how their top prospects stack up heading into 2015.

10. Sean Nolin

Sean Nolin Toronto Blue Jays
Dan Hamilton- USA TODAY Sports

10. Sean Nolin

Sean Nolin Toronto Blue Jays
Dan Hamilton- USA TODAY Sports

Nolin posted a 3.50 ERA, 7.6 K/9 and 3.6 BB/9 in 17 Triple-A starts in 2014. While the 24-year-old lefty does not have the highest upside, he is ready to be a back-end starter in the big leagues. Nolin features a nice four-pitch mix that includes an average fastball, above-average changeup, average curveball and average slider. All of his stuff plays up thanks to great command and pitchability. He certainly could impact the Blue Jays in 2015.

9. Sean Reid-Foley

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9. Sean Reid-Foley

Toronto Blue Jays Stadium
Peter Llewellyn- USA TODAY Sports

The Blue Jays' second-round pick in 2014, many people outside the game thought him to be a first-round talent. He has a solid arsenal that includes a fastball, slider and changeup, with the slider having the best potential among the bunch. Reid-Foley may never have the stuff to be an ace, but he has better polish than most high school draftees. He seems more likely to be a mid-rotation starter when all is said and done.

8. Roberto Osuna

Toronto Blue Jays
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8. Roberto Osuna

Toronto Blue Jays
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Osuna missed most of 2014 after undergoing Tommy John surgery in 2013, and had he not he would likely rank much higher on this list. Still, Osuna is just 19 years old and has a nice low-to-mid 90s fastball that could tick up in the future. His changeup is a plus pitch, and he has a curveball that flashes plus, though it is wildly inconsistent. He also has great command of all of his pitches. Front-line upside is certainly there.

7. Franklin Barreto

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7. Franklin Barreto

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A shortstop, Barreto had a nice year at Short Season-A in 2014, hitting .311/.384/.481. Just 18, he has above-average bad speed and contact abilities, but he does have work to do with his pitch recognition. He is uber athletic with plus speed, which gives him a chance to stick at short. His actions are a bit awkward at the position, though, so a move to second or center could happen. In the end, he has the chance to be a dynamic leadoff hitter.

6. Devon Travis

Devon Travis Toronto Blue Jays
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6. Devon Travis

Devon Travis Toronto Blue Jays
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Acquired from the Detroit Tigers for Anthony Gose, the second baseman hit a solid .298/.358/.460 at Double-A in 2014. He has a plus hit tool, which will help him hit for great contact, though his power may turn out to be more of the gap variety. After that, he does not do any one thing particularly well, but he is average or a tick above in every facet of the game. He is not far off from being a solid all-around, everyday second baseman.

5. Max Pentecost

Max Pentecost Toronto Blue Jays
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5. Max Pentecost

Max Pentecost Toronto Blue Jays
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Pentecost was picked No. 11 overall by the Blue Jays in this year's draft, and he has the chance to be a fast-rising catcher. He does not stand out at any one thing, but rather he has average tools across the board. He should hit for decent average and power, and he has a solid plate approach. A plus, though inaccurate arm, and solid athleticism make him a great defender. He has the upside of a slightly above-average catcher.

4. Jeff Hoffman

Toronto Blue Jays
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4. Jeff Hoffman

Toronto Blue Jays
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Hoffman underwent Tommy John surgery before the 2014 draft, but the Blue Jays still picked him No. 9 overall. His fastball and curveball could be plus-plus, and his changeup has plus potential, though it needs some more development. He is extremely athletic but will need to add some muscle to help him repeat his delivery and hone in his command. Ace potential is there, but the downside is he won't throw a professional pitch until he's 22.

3. Dalton Pompey

Dalton Pompey Toronto Blue Jays
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3. Dalton Pompey

Dalton Pompey Toronto Blue Jays
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Pompey started the year in High-A but finished in the big leagues after hitting .317/.392/.469 across three minor league levels. He has an advanced approach at the plate with above-average contact abilities and average power that could end up a tick above. His plus speed and above-average arm help make him a plus-plus defender. Pompey could be an impact leadoff or No. 2 hitter in the big leagues soon.

2. Aaron Sanchez

Aaron Sanchez Toronto Blue Jays
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2. Aaron Sanchez

Aaron Sanchez Toronto Blue Jays
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Sanchez has some of the best stuff in the minors thanks to a plus fastball, curveball and changeup. Command and control issues have held him back his whole career, but they seemingly took a step forward in the second half of 2014. He could be an ace in the big leagues if he can prove that those improvements were not a fluke, but if those struggles resurface he could still be a mid-rotation starter or an impact reliever.

1. Daniel Norris

Daniel Norris Toronto Blue Jays
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1. Daniel Norris

Daniel Norris Toronto Blue Jays
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After underwhelming results in his first two pro seasons, Norris took a leap in 2014, posting a 2.53 ERA, 11.8 K/9 and 3.1 BB/9 across three minor league levels and making his big league debut as a 21-year-old. His plus fastball sits in the low-to-mid 90s with great late bite, and he also has a plus slider, an above-average changeup and an average curveball. His command and control took a step forward in 2014, and he has front-line upside.

Drew Jenkins is an MLB writer and Sabermetrics Columnist for RantSports.com. Follow him on Twitter @DrewJenkins77, “Like” him on Facebook, add him to your network on Google, or contact him at drewjenkins4@gmail.com.

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