UFC Color Commentator Joe Rogan Wants You To Be Strong Like Georges St-Pierre

Joe Rogan

Stephen R. Sylvanie – USA TODAY Sports

He is a guy who calls it like he sees it. When Joe Rogan works for the UFC, he gives informed commentary, verbalized clarity and the intensity of someone who respects the hormonal animalism of this thing called MMA.

His participation in fight-calling, however, is just the tip of the iceberg — the outer stratum of a layered, complex individual. His podcast, The Joe Rogan Experience sometimes features three-hour discourses with top-tier fighters like Bas Rutten, Brendan Schaub and Georges St-Pierre. Rogan uses the platform to put forth his philosophy on cultivating human potential and optimizing physical strength, personal integrity and mental adeptness.

It’s not the specifics of some of the products that sponsor Rogan’s podcast, it’s what they are designed to do for an individual and the fact that he endorses the benefits as an actual user. Supplements designed to enhance mental clarity are presented, but more importantly the idea of mental clarity is a prevailing theme that rubs off on viewers like the infectiousness of MMA.

Rogan urges people to take care of their minds while also working out smart with things like kettlebells and battle ropes to build functional strength rather than puffy, empty muscle that’s just for show. It’s a touching thing that a successful personality who has learned to thrive amid the cutthroat cesspool of Los Angeles actually cares about humanity enough to broadcast ideas that can actually help out the planet in the long run.

He doesn’t have to do this, yet he sets himself apart from the rest of the celebrity world by making it clear that he cares.

His podcast with Eddie Bravo offered detailed insight into the dynamics of Jiu-Jitsu as they deconstructed Bravo’s epic match with Royler Gracie and the strange aftermath involving Royce Gracie. His podcast with Rutten revealed the past of a fascinating man who was bullied as a kid and was a successful, self-trained MMA fighter. His podcasts with St-Pierre and Schaub reveal highly intelligent, eloquent guys who, in spite of their physicality, are anything but a couple of dumb jocks.

Rogan’s podcast is consistently engaging, educational, funny and empowering. After tuning in, you can’t help but want to be good at what you do and be good to the people with whom you interact. So the next time you’re watching a UFC card and Rogan’s voice is elevating in pitch to match the tension of the fight, remember there are things to learn and insights to consider.

After the blood is wiped up and faces are stitched closed, you can follow that voice and learn about grappling, boxing, kickboxing, physical conditioning and mental expansion.

Luke Schmaltz is a Combat Sports writer for RantSports.com. Follow him on Twitter @lukeschmaltz, like him on Facebook or add him to your network on Google.


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