Brandon Jennings Should Let His Play Do The Talking

On January 25th I wrote an article titled “Will Brandon Jennings Keep Up His Solid Play?” and at the time the article was written Jennings was enjoying his best season in the NBA. While he still is enjoying his best field goal percentage of his young career, his numbers have steadily dipped with the injury to Andrew Bogut.

The injury to Bogut happened on January 27th and Jennings has struggled without the Milwaukee Bucks best post player. In those nine games since the injury Jennings has averaged 15.2 points and has been held to under double digits in scoring three times. He’s also averaging 5.2 assists, 3.33 rebounds, on 36 percent shooting, 23 percent from beyond the arc and 70 percent from the free throw line.

With this slump it did answer the question of whether or not Jennings would be able to continue with his solid play. Yet, now there’s another issue that has come up with Bogut out of the lineup. Yet, last week an even bigger story broke out in regards to Jennings and that was the indication that he may not stay with the Bucks franchise.

ESPN’s Chris Broussard wrote about Jennings in an interview found at this link.

Jennings is quoted as saying “I am going to keep my options open, knowing that the time is coming up. I’m doing my homework on big-market teams.”

Yet, it was this quote from Broussard that really shows how Jennings is feeling “sources close to the situation said he is frustrated with the direction of the franchise.” While it’s understandable that Jennings is frustrated based on the injury history of Bogut and the Bucks roster being made up of role players. The question becomes is why say anything at all?

At the end of the season he does have a choice he can stay with the Bucks and sign a long term contract or decide to become an unrestricted free agent. Yet, not even half way through the season and Jennings is already thinking about what he’ll be doing in the future.

This is not surprising when it comes to Jennings as he has had maturity issues. An example of this is instead of playing one year of college basketball he decided to be paid while playing professionally overseas and he did not make a good first impression. Once his year was completed he bolted for the NBA Draft and was selected no.10 overall by the Bucks in 2009.

In his rookie year he put the league on notice when he scored 55 points against the Golden State Warriors. Yet, Jennings in his first season shot 37.1 percent from the field in his second season he improved to 39 percent and this season so far he’s finally broken the 40 percent mark hitting at a 41.6 percent mark and that percentage has been dropping steadily because of the injury to Bogut.

What’s interesting is that Jennings is considering leaving for a bigger market. The better question is what team would want a point guard that is as inefficient as Jennings? His assist numbers are less than stellar as well as in his rookie year he averaged 5.7 assists and in his second 4.8 assists. In the 27 games he’s played in this year he’s at 5.3 assists. Jennings is a good defender which makes the low assist totals bearable for the Bucks.

The issue for Jennings is finding a big market team that would be willing to bring in an inefficient point guard. He could have silenced those doubts by not giving any indication of what he was planning for in the future and continued to work on improving his jumper and raising his field goal percentage. At the moment the best decision for Jennings would be to sign a long term deal with the Bucks because it’s doubtful there would be much of a market for him.

 

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