LeBron James: The Standard of Athleticism

Greg M. Cooper

This wasn’t the American Airlines Arena. This wasn’t the Charlotte Bobcats. Yet, LeBron James mustered up eye-popping numbers last night: 37 points, seven rebounds, 12 assists, two steals and two blocks against the Boston Celtics at the TD Garden.

Although it was a close finish at 105-103, with the Miami Heat being the victors and extending their winning streak to 23, two things were made clear last night: James can score on the Celtics in Boston and he is the standard of an athlete.

As history has shown us, the Celtics are not a defensive threat to King James. LeBron can put up monster points against the Celtics in Boston whenever he wants and if you doubt me, need I remind you how he went on a scoring run in Game 6 of the Eastern Conference Finals last year in Boston?

So if the Celtics actually want to face the Heat in the playoffs again, they can look forward to His Majesty scoring at will and being eliminated by the Heat for the third time.

In addition, if you haven’t been following James’ statistics, you should be informed that this man isn’t only putting up points. Game after game, he is making a tremendous impact as an athlete, not just as a scorer. He is amounting rebounds, he is dishing the ball, earning assists; he is on top of his game on the defensive end, blocking and stealing — this is uncanny.

James is setting the standard of how an athlete in the NBA should perform. When scouts start setting their eyes out on college basketball players, they are going to begin quests for players that can score, assist, rebound and play defense. An athlete of such caliber will have a massive impact in the game, and we see it because James is showing it to us.

If you’re skeptical of this, then why is Dwyane Wade doing the same thing? If you look at Wade’s stats, you will see him not only scoring, but rebounding and assisting. This is what an athlete does — performs in multiple dimensions.

Say what you what about LeBron James. He will exceed Michael Jordan and become the standard of what an athlete represents.

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