Jeremy Lin A Key Cog In Houston Rockets’ Engine

Troy Taormina-USA TODAY Sports

We’ve been a witness to the Houston Rockets‘ big offseason. They’ve fashioned themselves as contenders after adorning their team with the biggest and shiniest ornament, Dwight Howard.

The top free agent of the offseason immediately sends the Rockets from an also-ran playoff team to legitimate contender. The 6-foot-11 agile center playing alongside James Harden gives the Rockets the most formidable inside-outside duo since Kobe Bryant and Pau Gasol first got together. Their teammates will be expected to step up in major ways to surpass expectations, and the main cog in this championship engine is Jeremy Lin.

Yes, that same Jeremy Lin who dazzled our hearts with New York Knicks for a span on 14 games. The same one who declared himself inactive for two consecutive playoff appearances, and also the player who threw 38 at the “Black Mamba” Kobe Bryant and the Los Angeles Lakers.

While his first season did produce some highlights, many have acknowledged that his consistency is a major hindrance to the Rockets reaching the promise land.

During his first season with the Rockets, Lin averaged 13.4 points per game on 44 percent shooting from the field. He shot a not-terrible 34 percent from three, but his 2.9 turnovers per game ranked among the league’s worst starters at that position. He has to be a more steady hand in the huddles and on the court for the Rockets this season.

Omer Asik has already asked for a trade. Chandler Parsons is going to have to get accustomed to a new role. The Rockets need a point guard to take a leadership role. Lin must assert himself in his second season and be a leader, or the Rockets will be doomed for a humongous let down.

Kyle Bostic is a writer for Rant Sports. Contact him of Twitter or like his Facebook page. Also add him onto your circles on Google.

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  • calvino

    Slight correction — Lin didn’t declare himself inactive for the playoff series against the Thunder, the team doctors did. He wanted to play, but McHale wouldn’t let him until he could perform in a meaningful way on the court.