Boston Celtics Draft Profile: Doug McDermott

Doug McDermott

Kevin Jairaj-USA TODAY Sports

The NBA Draft Combine has come and gone, and the Boston Celtics are primed to be major players in the draft with two Top 20 picks, including one in the lottery. This is going to be a profile mostly on the Celtics’ second pick in the draft, number 17, just outside of the lottery.

In this draft you can still get a solid player who can start or possibly be a rotation player for years to come. One prospect to think about is the National Player of the Year Doug McDermott aka Dougie McBuckets.

McDermott is a 6-foot-8 small forward out of Creighton who can stroke from pretty much anywhere on the court. He’s a lights out 3-point shooter who led the nation in scoring with 26.7 ppg and also grabbed 7 rpg.

Seeing a scoring average that high in college you would think he’s a volume shooter and didn’t shoot very well from the field. When you look at the numbers, he shot 53% from the field and 45% from behind the 3-point line. He was very efficient, in fact he was second in the nation in player efficiency.

He was a defensive liability for opposing teams who averaged .1 blocks and .2 steals per game. His lateral quickness and ability to play against great athletes is something to be concerned about. Check his game against Baylor in the NCAA tournament against those great athletes.

He’s not a bad athlete — he had a 35.5 inch max vertical, which is higher than the mystery man of the draft, Dante Exum, who had a 34.5 max vertical. That may not translate, but he’s a good athlete.

One of McDermott’s downsides is age. He’s 22 years old now, so that means he has limited upside. It also means he has a more polished game than some of the freshman coming out.

In the NBA of today you can never have too much shooting. With his shooting prowess, McDermott would open driving lanes for Rajon Rondo and Jeff Green to take advantage of.

A good NBA comparison for McDermott would be someone like Kyle Korver. He’s someone who can get hot from 3-point land and also someone who can put the ball on the floor a little bit. But he’ll have to work on his off-the-ball movement more in the league — he won’t be able to just out muscle people.

Edward Santiago is a Boston Celtics writer for rantsports.com you can follow him on Twitter, Facebook, or Google+

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  • Michael Hackmer

    What are the odds he will be available at 17 when the Celtics pick? Is he good enough, based on the talent available at 6, to take early? The other players I see available do not have his offensive skills or scoring ability. And short of getting a true Center who will be a game-changer, how many PFs do we really need?