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Doug McDermott Wins AP Player of the Year, Draft Stock Won’t Rise

Doug McDermott

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It’s the best time of the year for college basketball fans across the nation. The Final Four is finally here as the NCAA Tournament is winding down and college basketball’s top awards are now being announced. For Doug McDermott, this time of the year has been bittersweet.

The college basketball legend finished his career with the Creighton Blue Jays a bit earlier than he had hoped — no, he didn’t declare for the NBA draft early, but instead lost in the third round of the NCAA Tournament, failing to reach the Sweet 16 once again, making in 30 years since they last made one.

Creighton got to see one of the best college basketball players of all time, however. Although they haven’t had much tourney success, the Blue Jays got to witness the fifth best scorer in the history of college basketball and the school’s all-time best player.

Finishing his career with 3,149 points and a career average of over 20 points per game, McDermott has been a three-time All-American, but his most recent award has to top all of that.

The senior from Ames, Iowa, finished the 2013-14 season with 934 points, averaging 26.7 points per game as well as seven rebounds while shooting 45 percent from three-point range. Those kind of numbers usually equal big-time awards, especially now that the Blue Jays are a member of a “major” conference in the depleted Big East.

McDermott finished the season strong and was named the AP College Basketball Player of the Year on Thursday afternoon, putting a cherry on top of his career.

However, this means little for his NBA draft stock as he is widely considered a mid-first round pick with a lack of pure athleticism. While he could end up being a star at the next level, drawing unfair comparisons to Larry Bird, he doesn’t have as high of a ceiling as most.

Prove us wrong, Doug.

Don’t expect a rise in draft stock after this major award, and possibly others, however.

Connor Muldowney is a columnist for Follow him on Twitter @Connormuldowney, “Like” him on Facebook or add him to your network on Google. You can also reach him at