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Adreian Payne Proves Why the College Basketball Dunk Contest is Better Than the NBA’s

Adreian Payne

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Earlier this year, the NBA tried to make the annual dunk contest better and more intriguing, but, yet again, the league fell short of grasping the audience’s attention. The whole ‘team dunk round’ made people angry, and deservedly so. However, the college basketball dunk contest could be the new big thing for those hungry for a fantastic, pure dunk competition.

If you don’t trust me, just check out this ridiculous 360-esque heel-tapping throw-down by the Michigan State Spartans‘ big man, Adreian Payne.

While this might not be the best dunk you’ve ever seen, it was just one of the many dunks during the college competition that blew fans away.

The best part of this competition? Most of the dunks were completed on the first try — the same cannot be said for the NBA as some guys even attempted the same dunk two or three times, taking away from the impressiveness a bit.

Payne completed this on the first try and it was miraculous.

Cory Jefferson of Baylor also had some pretty solid dunks, including a free throw line jam in which the big man from Texas only needed one try to make one of the most impressive free throw line dunks I, and many others, have ever seen. Obviously other greats have completed the dunk, but this is a college kid doing it on the first try while current NBA players can’t do the same.

Eastern Kentucky‘s Marcus Lewis came away with the overall crown as he completed some stellar dunks of his own, even completing a windmill dunk over a grown man — easily.

This competition proves why the NBA’s contest is dying and why the college competition is many people’s new favorite.

Connor Muldowney is a columnist for RantSports.com. Follow him on Twitter @Connormuldowney, “Like” him on Facebook or add him to your network on Google. You can also reach him at connor.muldowney@rantsports.com.