Ranking The 10 Greatest Bloodlines In College Basketball History

Ranking The 10 Greatest Bloodlines In College Basketball History

Glenn Robinson III Michigan
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Glenn Robinson III leads a class of familiar-sounding names in this year's NBA Draft. While the dads on this list have established their legacy in the NCAA and NBA, the kids are aiming to make a name for themselves. Many of the kids are leading established programs and some have even outshined their fathers. Is there one father-son duo that rises above the rest? Here's a look at the most prominent bloodlines in college basketball history.

10. Ralph Sampson Jr. (Virginia) and Ralph Sampson III (Minnesota)

Ralph Sampson III Golden Gophers
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10. Ralph Sampson Jr. (Virginia) and Ralph Sampson III (Minnesota)

Ralph Sampson III Golden Gophers
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It's hard to compete with a dad like Ralph Sampson Jr., who is one of the best big men of all time in college basketball history. Sampson Jr. was a three-time Wooden Award winner. Sampson III joined Kevin McHale and Mychal Thompson as one of the only Minnesota centers to amass more than 1,000 points, 500 rebounds, and 200 blocks during their respective collegiate careers.

9. Glen Rice (Michigan) and Glen Rice Jr. (Georgia Tech)

Glen Rice Jr. Georgia Tech
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9. Glen Rice (Michigan) and Glen Rice Jr. (Georgia Tech)

Glen Rice Jr. Georgia Tech
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Glen Rice Jr. was one of the more experienced and talented players on a poor and rebuilding Georgia Tech squad. The elder Rice had one of the best NCAA tournaments in history, scoring 184 points and earning the NCAA Tournament Most Outstanding Player of the Year award in 1989. Rice Jr. was suspended from the Yellow Jackets for off-court issues.

8. Doc Rivers (Marquette) and Austin Rivers (Duke)

Austin Rivers Duke
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8. Doc Rivers (Marquette) and Austin Rivers (Duke)

Austin Rivers Duke
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Doc had a decent career with the Golden Eagles, but will probably be remembered more for his coaching abilities in the NBA. Austin Rivers has the chance to be better known as a college basketball player than as a pro. In just one season, Austin averaged 15.5 PPG and hit a game-winning 3-pointer against North Carolina to lead Duke to a come-from-behind win.

7. Rick Barry (Miami), Brent Barry (Oregon State), and Jon Barry (Georgia Tech)

Jon Barry Georgia Tech
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7. Rick Barry (Miami), Brent Barry (Oregon State), and Jon Barry (Georgia Tech)

Jon Barry Georgia Tech
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While the Barrys will be known for their successes in the NBA, each had solid college careers. As a senior at Miami in the 1964-65 campaign, Rick led the NCAA with a 37.4 PPG. Both Brent and Jon became first-round picks with the Oregon State Beavers and Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets, respectively.

6. John Stockton (Gonzaga) and David Stockton (Gonzaga)

David Stockton Gonzaga
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6. John Stockton (Gonzaga) and David Stockton (Gonzaga)

David Stockton Gonzaga
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During his senior year for the Bulldogs in 1984, John Stockton averaged 20.9 PPG and helped the Zags post a 17–11 record, their best in 17 years. He led the West Coast Athletic Conference in scoring, assists and steals. David has helped the Zags reach the NCAA tournament in each of his four seasons with the team.

5. Tim Hardaway Sr. (UTEP) and Tim Hardaway Jr. (Michigan)

Tim Hardaway Jr. Michigan
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5. Tim Hardaway (UTEP) and Tim Hardaway Jr. (Michigan)

Tim Hardaway Jr. Michigan
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Tim Hardaway played under legendary coach Don Haskins at UTEP. He played on teams that went to the NCAA tournament in 1988 and 1989, and won the Frances Pomeroy Naismith Award as the best college player in the nation under six feet tall. As a sophomore, Tim Hardaway Jr. helped lead Michigan to their first national championship game appearance since the Fab Five in the 1993 season.

4. Glenn Robinson (Purdue) and Glenn Robinson III (Michigan)

Glenn Robinson III Michigan
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4. Glenn Robinson (Purdue) and Glenn Robinson III (Michigan)

Glenn Robinson III Michigan
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At Purdue, Glenn Robinson left the school as the only Boilermaker to have more than 1,000 points, 500 rebounds, 100 steals, 100 assists and 50 blocked shots in a career. Robinson was named the John Wooden and Naismith Award winner in the 1993-94 season. Glenn Robinson III helped the Michigan Wolverines make the national championship game, and a year later, Robinson III led Michigan to the Elite Eight.

3. Dell Curry (Virginia Tech), Steph Curry (Davidson), and Seth Curry (Duke)

Steph Curry Davidson
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3. Dell Curry (Virginia Tech), Stephen Curry (Davidson), and Seth Curry (Duke)

Steph Curry Davidson
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The tandem of Dell and Stephen have been great in the NBA, but along with Seth, the Currys also were good in college. Dell led Virginia Tech to the 1983 and 1984 NIT tournaments. At Davidson, Steph had one of the best tournaments in recent memory, leading the Wildcats to the Elite Eight as a sophomore. Finally, Seth first started at Liberty before transferring to Duke. In 2012-13, Curry and the Blue Devils reached the Elite Eight.

2. Bill Walton (UCLA) and Luke Walton (Arizona)

Luke Walton Lakers
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2. Bill Walton (UCLA) and Luke Walton (Arizona)

Luke Walton Lakers
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Bill and Luke Walton each made an NCAA championship game appearance, and each also won multiple NBA Championships. Bill was one of the game's greatest players, winning two titles in 1972 and 1973, and was the NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player. At Arizona, Luke made the NCAA tournament each season and helped the Wildcats reach the 2001 national championship game.

1. Scott May (Indiana) and Sean May (North Carolina)

Sean May North Carolina
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1. Scott May (Indiana) and Sean May (Indiana)

Sean May North Carolina
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Scott and Sean May are one of just four father-son duos to each win an NCAA basketball championship. Scott played for Indiana University under legendary coach Bobby Knight, and Sean May played for North Carolina under coach Roy Williams. In 1976, Scott led the Hoosiers to an undefeated season and was the Naismith College Player of the Year. Sean was the NCAA Final four Most Outstanding Player in 2005.

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