Alabama Tops Harris Interactive College Football Poll

 

University of Alabama football has been ranked #1 with 108 votes, in the nationally represented and respected Harris Interactive column. This is the first poll of this type of the 2012 football season, ranking the top 25 college football teams by utilizing a panel of former coaches, players, administrators and current and former members of the media. The following teams round out the top 5 spots in this order: Oregon, South Carolina, West Virginia and Kansas State.

According to the company, 113 poll participants chosen from a nominated 300 were chosen to be a statically valid representation of the 11 football bowl conference subdivisions and independent schools, from which these nominations were submitted. This week, these panelists submitted their top 25 rankings which are verified by standard statistical approaches, among other analysis, in an attempt to accurately reflect the intent of the panelists for polling purposes. Within the world of college football, the list remains consistent with similar studies, polls and rankings.

What makes this poll more interesting as college sports are concerned in particular, is the combination of modern social networking tools in analyzing individual and social psychological profiles, for purposes of acquiring a more accurate panelist profile along with the surprising categorization of sports as a manufacturing and industrial industry, as opposed to media and entertainment, consumer goods or as a private sector ad management system. Of course, I would doubt information to be readily available, if at all, as to the depth of analysis of this particular survey or the exact expertise in this field of those involved in the study for practical, bar bet purposes.

Alabama tops the list in almost every poll so far, in keeping as the favorite across most surveys in this week of NCAA football surveys. The more comprehensive BCS standings should be available by week 8, which is comprised of USA Today’s coaches’ poll, the Harris Interactive College Football Poll, as well as an average of 6 computer rankings, all three which are given equal weight and are evaluated on a weekly basis for variations in number of voters as part of an agreed upon equation used by the National Football Foundation and the College Hall of Fame to determine, among other issues, who will compete in the national championship game.

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