College Football Playoff Needs Conference Limitations

ESPN to Air College Football Playoff

Derick Hingle-US Presswire

It’s not a secret that the SEC has dominated the college football landscape for nearly a decade–winning the last seven BCS national championships–and if SEC commissioner Mike Slive has his way, his conference will continue its reign when the new playoff format begins in 2014.

Slive’s no dummy, so what better way to increase the odds of continued SEC dominance than by lobbying for “knowledgeable” football people to be a part of the playoff selection committee? Slive understands that the majority of college football media members drool and trip all over themselves every time the SEC comes up in a discussion, and if the media gets to be a part of a selection process that doesn’t include restrictions on conference champions, the SEC may hold a monopoly on college football for years to come.

On Monday, Slive to members of the media that, “We want football expertise.  We want integrity, and we want transparency because this is our opportunity to make sure that not only are we comfortable but you’re (the media) comfortable and all the fans are comfortable that this process is the way it should be.”  I’m sure you do Mike…I’m sure you do.  It’s easy to come off as a bastion of “fairness and equality”, but he knows deep down that he just wants the media to continue its teeny-bopper like crush on his conference.

I have said it before and I will continue to say it:  No team deserves to play for a national championship that doesn’t win its own conference championship.  Alabama getting a rematch against LSU a few seasons ago was the worst thing (in my opinion) to happen to college football on the field in quite some time.  It alienated the fans outside of SEC country and it lacked any new storylines.  Sure you have rematches in the conference title games, but Alabama failed to even win its division that season.

No matter what is decided regarding the selection committee, you can bet that there will be people that are unhappy, but as Slive added, “You’re (selection committee) there to represent football and what’s in the best interest of football, what’s in the best interest of the playoffs.”

That is true, Mr. Slive.  Whoever is a part of the selection committee is supposed to represent football and what’s in the best interest of football.  The problem for you and the SEC, however, is that catering to your conference isn’t what’s best for the game, and it isn’t what’s in the best interest of college football.  Ask anyone in ACC, Big XII, Pac 12 or Big Ten country what they think.

I can guarantee you that they will all agree that college football isn’t about what is best for the SEC.

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