Michigan AD Dave Brandon Should Wait And See Before Worrying About Playoffs

Michigan AD

Rick Osentoski-USA TODAY Sports

Why is Michigan AD Dave Brandon skeptical about the new college football playoff system that is set to begin in 2014?

Does it make too much sense for Brandon to realize that people would like to see championships decided on the field as opposed to what computers tell us?

At a recent speaking engagement in Livonia, Michigan, Brandon said about the playoffs, “I’m a reluctant participant in this new model simply because I don’t know where this all ends.” He added, “It’s not going to settle anything about who’s the national champion. There’s going to be a lot of judgment involved with four teams involved.”

How is that any different than today? Controversy is everywhere you look in the world of college sports. When the 68 teams are announced for the NCAA basketball tournament, does Brandon think everyone agrees with the field and programs selected?

Controversy is what makes sports so much fun as a fan.

I think Brandon would be better served focusing his worries towards how the teams are going to be selected. If my biggest fear comes to light and teams can make the four-team playoff without winning (or at the very least playing) in their conference championship, then I think we will see problems with the new system.

If we continue to allow teams the opportunity to play for a national championship without winning their own league title first, all we are doing is minimizing the significance of the regular season, and potentially telling some conferences that others are worth more (which we kind of see already).

Brandon’s fear of the unknown (in wondering how far this thing will go) should be minimal at best. But if it is such a pressing priority, then I just can’t understand why FBS members don’t just take a page from their FCS brethren. FCS schools have been playing complete regular season schedules along with a playoff format for years without a hitch.

If the little guys can do it, so can the big boys.

If the obscure bowl games are the main concern, then keep them. Continue to give the schools that don’t qualify for the playoffs (and schools that don’t deserve a chance to play in a bowl game like they do today) a chance to experience the postseason. 90 percent of the bowls are unwatched by the masses anyway.

But before we start worrying about how far this playoff thing is going to go, shouldn’t we wait and see how the first attempt plays out?

I think we should.

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