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NCAA Football Texas Longhorns

5 Potential Jobs For Mack Brown After Fallout With Texas Longhorns

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5 Potential Jobs For Mack Brown

Mack
Jerome Miron - USA TODAY Sports

Texas Longhorns head coach Mack Brown recently resigned from his coaching duties after four mediocre years of leading the Longhorns to achieve, well, mediocrity. Brown was in for at least another season, riding on the support of his university's president Bill Powers, but apparently, Powers had a last minute change of heart and Brown was forced to resign after all.

Since his resignation, there have been many praises for Brown, including from Powers and first-year Longhorns athletic director Steve Patterson, as well as for Brown's representation of his university and his many contributions to the football program, which he's led since 1997.

Texas went 8-4 this season, which would be the fourth straight year the Longhorns finish with four or more losses, though their 7-2 record in the Big 12 this year was their best since 2009 when they went to the BCS National Championship Game.

Brown wasn't without great years with the Longhorns, but you can only ride on your laurels for so long. Overall, the Longhorns have lacked identity and direction under Brown's leadership, or lack thereof, in recent years, and his recruiting methods and results have been out-shined by other NCAA coaches like Urban Meyer and Nick Saban. In short, Texas has had to brave too many embarrassing losses.

In this economy, one is sometimes forced to "think outside the box," as they say, and may have to consider non-traditional venues and consider different career directions than previously realized.

Here are five potential jobs that I thought might be perfect for Brown to consider while waiting in the unemployment line. Let me know what you think!

Jonathan W. Crowell is a writer and an online sports blogger for Rantsports.com. Follow him on Twitter @JW_Crowell, “like” him on Facebook, or add him to your network on Google.

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5. Become A Texas Longhorn Rancher

Longhorn
Image Courtesy of Instagram

For starters, Brown might consider the lonely, rugged life of a cowboy, herding and ranching actual Texas longhorns.

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4. Return To University Of North Carolina

UNC
Rob Kinnan - USA TODAY Sports

Brown was the head football coach of the University of North Carolina Tar Heels from 1988-97. He was originally hired for that gig under the promise that he would not go to the University of Texas, which, of course, he specifically did in 1997.

Since then, he has become the highest paid public official, perhaps in the world, with a salary alone of more than $5 million. Perhaps they'd have him back as head coach at UNC. The Tarheels are known for letting bygones be bygones, aren't they?

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3. Go Into Investment Banking

Gordon Gekko
Image Courtesy of Facebook

With all that cash he made during his 16-year stint as head coach at Texas, perhaps Brown should consider going into investment banking. He could be the next Gordon Gekko. Greed is good, Mack, greed is good.

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2. Go To Work In Santa's Workshop

Elf
Image Courtesy of Facebook

Given Brown's cheery disposition, there's still time for him to join the ranks of Santa's happy little helper elves to help meet the yearly gift quota. Case in point, an epic, and I mean epic, meltdown in December of 2012 when Brown went on a public segue into psychosis on national television during a game against the Kansas State Wildcats. He proceeded to hurl his headphones onto the ground with utter contempt, then realized a moment later that he needed them to, ya know, continue coaching.

After all, smiling is Brown's favorite.

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1. Become A Recruiter For Texas Longhorns

Mack
Brendan Maloney - USA TODAY Sports

Why leave Texas with bad blood? Granted, recruiting was never your strong suit, Mack, and you might have to take a substantial pay cut, but how about taking on more of an administrative role at Texas and helping out with recruitment?

Your first order of business? Finding your own replacement.