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NFL Arizona Cardinals

New York Jets CB Darrelle Revis Turning in Greatest Season by a Cornerback in NFL History

For two and a half seasons, Jets’ cornerback Darrelle Revis has established himself as the top cornerback in the National Football League.

He turned in one of the greatest seasons by a cornerback in league history in 2009, holding opponents to 48 completions in 127 pass attempts for 502 yards, two touchdowns, and eight interceptions.

He turned in a slightly disappointing season (by Revis’s standards) in 2010, but has rebounded with a 2011 season that rates as arguably the greatest season by a cornerback in league history.

Through seven games, the passing statistics against him are: 10-33, 120 yards, 0 TD, 4 INT, 2.9 rating.

Five of those completions came in one game and three came in another, meaning he has allowed two completions (in 13 targets) in the other five games.

He’s defensed six passes and intercepted four, meaning that he is just as likely to get his hand on a ball as the opponent is to catch the ball.

He returned one of those interceptions 100 yards for a touchdown (against Miami). Combined, the four interceptions have netted him 184 yards and a touchdown.

So he has more interception return yards than he has allowed in receiving yards allowed. He has more touchdowns on defense than he has allowed on offense.

To compare him against his peers, the second best cornerback in the NFL, in terms of passer rating, is Carolina Panthers cornerback Chris Gamble, who has allowed a 39.4 passer rating.

The best game against Revis this season, in terms of passer rating, was 42.4. That was when he allowed one catch (for four yards) in three pass attempts against the New England Patriots in week five. That’s the BEST game against Revis this whole season.

He’s as much of a shut-down corner as the league has ever seen. Ever.

He doesn’t have great games followed by bad games that make his statistics look so much better. He’s just consistently incredible.

He finished second in the Defensive Player of the Year voting in 2009 (to Green Bay’s Charles Woodson), but he remains the early favorite—by a landslide—to take home the award this year.

If he keeps up his current pace, he may even finish with the greatest season by a cornerback in league history.