Philadelphia Eagles QB Michael Vick Proving to Be No Different From Donovan McNabb in the Clutch

When Donovan McNabb’s tenure as the Eagles quarterback came to a conclusion following the 2009 season, many fans were thrilled because it meant that the Eagles would no longer have to put up with McNabb’s inability to lead the Eagles to a win with the game on the line.

After Michael Vick replaced Kevin Kolb as the starting quarterback early in the 2010 season, he showed that he had what it makes to lead the Eagles to come-from-behind victories. The New Miracle at the Meadowlands, when the Eagles scored 28 points in the final quarter to win 38-31 and stun the Giants, showed that Vick is more than just an elite quarterback–he’s a clutch quarterback as well.

But Vick has done everything he could to dispel that myth over the past 11 months.

His Eagles are 3-8 in his last 11 games, including a home playoff loss. And a number of the games have come down to failed fourth quarter drives.

In the playoff loss to the Packers, Vick chucked a deep pass to Riley Cooper that was intercepted by Riley Cooper. The Eagles lost in the final minute.

Against the 49ers, Vick had the Eagles driving but a Jeremy Maclin fumble ruined the chances of an Eagles comeback. Against Chicago, Vick threw high to Maclin on a 4th and 10 pass. Maclin slipped and gained just nine yards. And against the Cardinals in today’s loss, Vick threw a deep pass that was intercepted.

Oh, and then there are the games (Atlanta, the Giants) in which Vick was hurt for the final quarter.

It’s not just those games either. Vick has failed to move the ball for the offense in almost every fourth quarter. The Eagles defense has received the majority of the criticism for the blown leads in the fourth quarter but if the offense was scoring points at all, or even a threat to score points, maybe the leads wouldn’t all be blown.

Vick is turning into nothing more than a glorified version of Donovan McNabb, and we all remember how McNabb performed with the game on the line. It’s not always the quarterback’s fault–sometimes the receivers help–but whatever the case, the job hasn’t been getting done.

Consistently.


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