Chicago Bears: Statistics Paint a Pretty Picture After 5 Weeks

Phil Sears-US PRESSWIRE

The Chicago Bears destroyed the Jacksonville Jaguars, to take their regular season record to 4-1 on Sunday, but the first five weeks of the regular season have kicked up some interesting statistics for Bears’ fans to mull over.

Although Tim Jennings has been given the plaudits of NFC defensive player of the month, Lance Briggs in my opinion has been the outstanding performer for the Bears defense through five weeks.

Before this season Briggs had a total of 144 interception return yards with 3 touchdowns, this season he already stands at 110 yards and 2 touchdowns.

On Top of this Briggs has five pass deflections in this season, which is one more than he totalled for the whole of the 2011 NFL regular season. All this for a guy who was lumped into the aging defense stigma this Bears defense received this offseason.

With Chris Conte and Major Wright paired as the Bears’ starting safeties for 11 games (dating to last season), opposing quarterbacks have thrown for only seven touchdown passes. The Bears, meanwhile, have 21 interceptions.

The Bears defense already has more intercepted touchdowns than every team but the Detroit Lions, had for the whole of the 2011 NFL regular season. Their 13 picks so far this season would also be enough to rank them 23rd overall for the 2011 season.

Sunday was the first time since 1950 that the Bears had defensive touchdowns in three straight games.

To top this stat, Charles Tillman and Briggs became the first set of teammates in NFL history to both return interceptions for a touchdown in consecutive games.

Brandon Marshall already has enough receiving yards (496) to rank 3rd overall against the Bears wide receiver core from the 2011 regular season.

Marshall’s 35 receptions so far this season ranks him just 2 behind both Johnny Knox and Roy Williams (37) 2011 totals and 17 behind Matt Forte (52). Anyone who doubted that Marshall was not a legit Number 1 receiver that would impact this team were flat out wrong.


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