The ugly numbers from an ugly Oakland Raiders’ loss

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By the Numbers: Oakland Raiders vs. Baltimore Ravens

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Kirby Lee- US PRESSWIRE

It was a bad day for the Oakland Raiders’ defense and that’s putting it lightly. Giving up 55 points in a game is every defensive coordinator’s nightmare, yet that is exactly what Oakland allowed against the Baltimore Ravens.

It was an especially difficult day for the secondary, which let Joe Flacco throw all over them and make several explosive plays. They did manage to get an interception, but the Raiders only managed a chip-shot field goal from the turnover. Flacco’s most reliable weapon was tight end Dennis Pitta, who had five catches for 67 yards and a score. However, Torrey Smith truly burned the Raiders with his two catches, both of which ended in six points and both of which went for 20 yards or more.

The only Raiders’ player who could say he had a good day was Carson Palmer. The quarterback matched his Baltimore counterpart stride-for-stride for the most part. He had 368 yards, two touchdowns and a pick. However, the rest of the offense did not do enough to support him. Palmer was sacked three times and his top targets only made about half the catches intended for them.

The worst part about the day for Oakland is that its most reliable unit, the special teams, failed them miserably. You can’t blame the specialists who did everything that was asked of them, but the punt and kickoff coverage units were lacking. The field goal defense team was terrible and allowed a punter to score on them. The return units weren’t actually all that bad, but as a whole the special teams was a disappointment.

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0- Times Oakland sacked Joe Flacco

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Kirby Lee- US PRESSWIRE

You could have predicted some issues for the defensive line without Richard Seymour, but the lack of pressure was disappointing. There is so much talent on the line that to not have any sacks and to only get four hits on the quarterback was upsetting. The line certainly didn't give the secondary much help.

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0- Red zone touchdowns for the Raiders

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Kirby Lee- US PRESSWIRE

Oakland entered the red zone three times and it did not score a touchdown on any trip. In fact, the Raiders only got three measly points out of those trips. If you get that close to the end zone, you have to come away with some points.

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2- Ravens' special teams touchdowns

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Kirby Lee- US PRESSWIRE

One special teams touchdown is an issue, but two is an epidemic. The Raiders gave up an 105-yard kickoff return to Jacoby Jones and also a seven-yard run to punter Sam Koch on a fake field goal. When your best unit has a game like this, it shows there's an issue with the team.

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6.8- Yards per play for Baltimore

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James Lang- US PRESSWIRE

Oakland dominated the time of possession and ran more plays than Baltimore and this stat is the primary cause. When you can pick up seven yards on each play, moving down an 100-yard field isn't so tough. It also helps Baltimore had six pass plays that went for more than 20 yards.

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7- Ravens' touchdowns

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Mitch Stringer- US PRESSWIRE

It seems like a given that this is too many touchdowns, but just think about it for a second. Baltimore scored seven touchdowns and none of them came from the defense. Granted some of these came on special teams, but you can't win if you give up seven touchdowns.

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10- Penalties on Oakland

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Kevin Liles- US PRESSWIRE

The little yellow flags reappeared this weekend for the Raiders. Just when you think their discipline problems have been solved, they have a game like this. Oakland has to stop shooting themselves in the foot with penalties or it might not win another game this season.

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341- Passing yards for Joe Flacco

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Kirby Lee- US PRESSWIRE

There's embarassing pass defense and humiliating pass defense and this performance falls into the latter category. Flacco completed 21-of-33 passes and he diced the Raiders for big play after big play. If there was one number to describe why Oakland lost it would be this one.


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