Kansas City Chiefs: Offense Must Run Through Jamaal Charles in 2013

Denny Medley-USA TODAY Sports

With the quarterback situation in a state of uncertainty right now for the Kansas City Chiefs, they’re a team that’s going to have to play the cards they have in 2013. Their Ace is of course, is Jamaal Charles. Even through an up-and-down 2012 season, Charles still managed to rack up 1,509 yards on the ground, only one year after ACL surgery.

This is even more ridiculous when you consider that there were three games in which Charles ran for 10 yards or less. Conversely, whenever he carried the ball 20 or more times, he always eclipsed the 100-yard mark. Moral of the story – give the ball to Charles.

I’m calling for the Chiefs to take a page out of the Adrian Peterson playbook, as in, just give it to the tailback.

Charles finished 2012 with 285 carries, far behind Peterson’s 348. It’s clear that with more attempts, Charles would easily flirt with 2,000 yards. He’s a player entering his prime at only 26, and the Chiefs don’t have much going outside of maybe Dwayne Bowe, so I think they just need to let Charles carry the load and see what happens.

There’s no question that when Charles is on top of his game, that he’s probably the best back in the AFC.

One area where he could improve, would be as a receiver. Charles was targeted 48 times through the air last season, and caught 35 for 236 yards. If he could increase his yardage to near 500, it would figure to help open things up for the rest of the KC receivers.

Running the offense through Charles should be strategy implemented by Andy Reid in 2013. Even though you think of Reid as a passer-friendly coach, he will still get the best out of Charles. Just remember how great Brian Westbrook used to be in the Philadelphia Eagles offense a few years back.

Realistically, I don’t expect Reid to run an offensive scheme like the Minnesota Vikings with AP, but he knows that he has to utilize his most dynamic play-maker in Charles, if the Chiefs are to have any chance at respectability.

 

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