Robert Prince Faces Tough Task As Detroit Lions Wide Receivers Coach

Brian Losness-USA TODAY Sports

Jim Caldwell continues to mold his coaching staff at a rapid pace. The Detroit Lions announced on Saturday that they have hired Boise State’s offensive coordinator Robert Prince as their next receivers coach.

Prince replaces Tim Lappano who spent the past five seasons with the team as the tight ends coach (2009-2012) and receivers coach (2013). He inherits a receiving corps that features the best receiver in the game in Calvin Johnson along with Nate Burleson, Ryan Broyles,  Kris Durham, Kevin Ogletree and Michael Spurlock.

Prince’s track record includes several years of NFL coaching experience. He spent 2004-2006 as an offensive assistant for the Atlanta Falcons, helping out with running backs and tight ends. He then moved on to the Jacksonville Jaguars where he was the assistant wide receivers coach for two years. He also was the wide receivers coach for the Seattle Seahawks in 2009. After his stint in Seattle, he moved to the college ranks where he was Colorado’s passing game coordinator in 2010 before heading to Boise State to be their offensive coordinator in 2011.

Prince has a challenging task in molding together what is sure to be a different receiving corps for the Lions in 2014. Broyles has had an injury plagued career thus far, missing six games in the 2012 season after tearing his ACL in Week 13 and missing the team’s final eight games in 2013 after rupturing his Achilles in Week 8. Both injuries follow an ACL tear that he suffered in his senior year at Oklahoma. Unrestricted free agents Ogletree and Spurlock are likely to leave the team and Durham is a restricted free agent.  The team is likely to add to the position via free agency or the 2014 NFL Draft, so it will more than likely be different than it was in 2013.

Jared Goltz is a writer for Rant Sports. You can follow him on Twitter @jar3d_, or find him on Facebook or Google+


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  • twelsh36446

    What WRs the Lions have only one.