Super Bowl 2014: Percy Harvin Came Through When it Mattered Most

Mark J. Rebilas-USA TODAY Sports

Heading into Super Bowl XLVIII, one of the biggest questions for the Seattle Seahawks was that of wide receiver Percy Harvin and his health. Many predicted Harvin to exit the game before the end of the first half, or to possibly not be as big of a factor as he knew he was capable of being.

After all, injuries have taken a toll on Harvin in the past year or so, and the Seahawks were just praying he’d make it out of this one unharmed. Harvin did just that, and more, on Sunday night as the Seahawks defeated the Denver Broncos to take home the Lombardi Trophy.

After catching one pass for 17 yards in his only action of the 2013 regular season, Harvin’s action on Super Bowl Sunday was nothing short of spectacular. The box score won’t jump out at you when looking at Harvin’s stat line, but his effect on the team as a whole was absolutely felt.

Harvin ran the ball twice in the game for a total of 45 yards, showing off his usual speed and quick cuts that we’ve seen from him in seasons prior. Nothing was more exciting for Harvin on this occasion, though, than returning the opening kickoff of the second half 87 yards for a score.

The Seahawks are world champions and, contrary to popular belief throughout the last few months, Harvin was a big reason why. Harvin wasn’t able to contribute much up until this point, but in the Super Bowl he strutted his stuff and blew the game open after the Broncos were thinking it was time for a comeback.

Going up against an all-time great like Peyton Manning, the Seahawks knew that he would come out of the second half looking for blood. But, Harvin had other plans. Instead, he took the life out of Denver with his 87-yard return and, just like that, it was only a matter of time before the Seahawks were hoisting the most coveted trophy in all of football.

Ryan Heckman is a Senior Writer for RantSports.comFollow him on Twitter @ryanmheckman, “Like” him on Facebook or add him to your network on Google.


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