2014 NFL Draft: 5 Late-Round Sleepers the Kansas City Chiefs Should Target

1 of 6

2014 NFL Draft: 5 Late-Round Sleepers the Kansas City Chiefs Should Target

Dri Archer
Jim O' Connor-USA TODAY Sports

The Kansas City Chiefs may have finally found their franchise quarterback in Alex Smith. Smith was acquired from the San Francisco 49ers prior to the 2013 season and was clearly the most capable signal-caller that Kansas City has seen in quite some time.

While undoubtedly a much-needed move, GM John Dorsey did toss two valuable draft picks to the Niners in exchange for the former No. 1 overall selection. San Fran took the Chiefs' 2013 second-round draft pick, and since Smith led KC to at least a .500 record, it gets their second-round pick this year as well.

This leaves the Chiefs with several holes to fill and only one of the first 86 picks to work with. Dorsey and company are forced to either look to free agency to address their issues or target sleepers with their later picks in the draft.

Dorsey gained a reputation for his notoriously keen eye for talent while in the front office for the Green Bay Packers, and it's never been needed more than now. With limited cap space available, finding undervalued talent in the late rounds of the draft will be crucial to Kansas City's chances of improvement next season.

Several analysts have called this year's draft class "historically deep," particularly at the wide receiver position. Seeing that one of Kansas City's most pressing needs lies at wideout, a late-round pickup could potentially become a Week 1 starter.

Here are five players that have largely flown under the radar thus far and should still be available for Kansas City when Day 2 rolls around.

2 of 6

5. FS Tre Boston -- North Carolina

Tre Boston
Liz Condo-USA TODAY Sports

You know the deal by now. Free safety is the Chiefs' most glaring need, and North Carolina's Tre Boston could be a perfect later-round selection. He's super quick, changes direction well and is often best when covering tight ends. To boot, the kid may own the best hands in the draft, grabbing 12 interceptions during his Tar Heel career. With Kendrick Lewis likely gone, Boston is a realistic possibility as Kansas City's fourth-round pick.

3 of 6

4. WR Tevin Reese -- Baylor

Tevin Reese
Jerome Miron-USA TODAY Sports

Tevin Reese looked like a Biletnikoff Award candidate prior to injuring his wrist during his senior year. In just seven games he logged 33 receptions for 824 yards and eight touchdowns as Baylor owned one of the most potent offenses in the nation. He's small, quick and fast; in other words, Andy Reid's ideal receiver. Reese will continue to uphold Baylor's recently-gained reputation as "Wide Receiver U;" it's just a matter of for whom.

4 of 6

3. CB Pierre Desir -- Lindenwood

Pierre Desir
Derick E. Hingle-USA TODAY Sports

Pierre Desir has already been pegged as this draft's dark horse by several analysts, and he'd fit seamlessly into the Chiefs' secondary. He's a solid cover corner and possesses the size and athleticism to hang with the NFL's larger targets. For DC Bob Sutton, he'd likely play mostly against three-receiver sets while giving Sean Smith some friendly competition for Kansas City's second cornerback spot.

5 of 6

2. DE Ed Stinson -- Alabama

Ed Stinson
Daniel Shirey-USA TODAY Sports

With impending free agent Tyson Jackson's days in Kansas City possibly numbered, Alabama DE Ed Stinson would be an ideal fit for a Chiefs line that struggles against the run. They were 24th against it in 2013, allowing opposing backs to gain 4.5 YPC. Stinson has proven a more-than-capable run stopper and likely will be available when Kansas City's fifth-round pick rolls around.

6 of 6

1. RB Dri Archer -- Kent State

Ken Blaze
Ken Blaze-USA TODAY Sports

I was already high on Dri Archer before his combine-best 4.26 40-yard dash, but I'm even higher on him after. Archer was a running back for Kent State but projects as a slot receiver at the NFL level. He excels at making plays after the catch, which meshes with QB Alex Smith's game perfectly. Think of him as McCluster 2.0, only faster and with more potential upside.


Around the Web