Seattle Seahawks’ 5 Biggest Offseason Mistakes So Far

The Seattle Seahawks’ 5 Biggest Offseason Mistakes So Far

Russell Wilson Seahawks
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The Seattle Seahawks have gone through plenty of changes this offseason -- some positive and some negative. The Seahawks lost a host of players like Chris Clemons and Red Bryant, but they did gain players like Terrelle Pryor and re-signed Michael Bennett.

While the Seahawks have had a productive offseason so far, here are five of the their biggest mistakes up to this point.

5. Letting CB Walter Thurmond Go

Walter Thurmond Seahawks
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5. Letting CB Walter Thurmond Go

Walter Thurmond Seahawks
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The Seahawks really lucked out last year after losing Brandon Browner to a major suspension. Players like Thurmond stepped up and produced big-time for the Seahawks. Instead of retaining Thurmond, a more proven player, the Seahawks opted to let him walk and he eventually signed with the New York Giants. I still have my reservations about Byron Maxwell as a No. 2 corner, and Thurmond would have been a better option.

4. Letting OT Breno Giacomini Go

Breno Giacomini Seahawks
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4. Letting OT Breno Giacomini Go

Breno Giacomini Seahawks
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When the Seahawks really struggled on offense last year, the offensive line was banged up and right tackle Breno Giacomini was sorely missed as the Seahawks went through a bunch of low-round picks. Giacomini signed this offseason with the New York Jets, and the Seahawks will now have to address their offensive line early in next month's draft.

3. Letting WR Golden Tate Go

Golden Tate Seahawks
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3. Letting WR Golden Tate Go

Golden Tate Seahawks
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The receiving corps of Seattle was justifiably questioned last year as the team used some no-name players to catch passes from Russell Wilson. The best of this group was Golden Tate, who was Seattle's leading receiver and a valuable returner on special teams. Tate is now off to Detroit, and the Seahawks will have to expect that Percy Harvin can stay healthy for 16 games, which is highly unlikely and a scary proposition to make.

2. Re-Signing WR Sidney Rice

Sidney Rice Seahawks
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2. Re-Signing WR Sidney Rice

Sidney Rice Seahawks
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The Seahawks were better in 2013 without Sidney Rice than they were with him. The receiver was grossly overpaid when he signed in 2011, and once he suffered a torn ACL earlier in the year, Seattle's offense was better without him than with him. Rice is now back in Seattle, but at least it's for a relatively low salary.

1. Trading For QB Terrelle Pryor

Terrelle Pryor Raiders
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1. Trading For QB Terrelle Pryor

Terrelle Pryor Raiders
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The Seahawks already have a franchise quarterback in Russell Wilson and a solid backup in Tarvaris Jackson, which makes the trade for QB Terrelle Pryor even more perplexing. I might be reading too much into this, but bringing in and trading for another quarterback is not what the Seahawks need, especially a quarterback who is a below average passer.


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  • str8hawks

    Oh man, this may have been one of the least insightful articles I’ve ever read regarding the Seahawks.

    1) Walter Thurmond, an oft-injured player who never really lived up to his potential, lost the starting job to Byron Maxwell for good reason. While Thurmond provided a good option against speedier slot style receivers, he commanded too much money for a #3 CB, especially with the solid play of Jeremy Lane and the high ceiling of Tharold Simon.

    2) Breno Giacomini was a horribly inconsistent tackle, and was one of the most penalized players in the league. He may have provided good initial push and was fairly good in the run game, but his lacking footwork left much to be desired in the passing game. Paired with his penalty prone style of play and the emergence of Michael Bowie and Alvin Bailey, Giacomini was more than expendable and we now have much cheaper options until a long-term replacement is found.

    3) Golden Tate may have been the leader of a subpar group, but that’s all he was. Tate was consistently unable to gain much separation, forcing Russel Wilson to extend plays. Just because Russel Wilson is able to make up for lackluster receivers, does not mean he should be asked to do so on a consistent basis, and once again there is now room for a much better option to be found in the upcoming draft for a much more cost-efficient price.

    4) I also believe that the resigning of an older, injury-prone receiver is a mistake. However, Rice was resigned with very little in the way of guaranteed money, and gives the Seahawks a low-risk high-reward potential. There can be no argument that the man makes plays if he can stay healthy, and the Seahawks are more than willing to cut aging veterans who will not prove to contribute as evidenced with the signings and subsequent releases of Antoine Winfield, Terrell Owens, LenDale White and Plaxico Burress in seasons past. It could also go the other way such as the cases of Lawyer Milloy or Mike Williams.

    5) Terrelle Pryor was most likely not brought in to compete as a quarterback. He has very similar attributes as another player recently brought in as a potential signing, Jermichael Finley. Terrelle Pryor is an exceptional athlete (holds the record for longest run by a QB of 93 yards) and at the very least provides competition at the backup position with Tarvaris Jackson, in line with Pete Carroll’s mantra, “Always Compete”, and is well worth a 7th Rd pick. How frequently do you think 7th Rd picks even make the team, especially one with the depth of the Hawks.

    I think you may have lost sight that the NFL is a business, and teams must not simply to resign fan favorites, and must look for the maximum amount of output for the price. This is the formula the Seahawks have used with great success, and now with the upcoming contracts to Sherman, Thomas, Wilson, Russel Okung, and the recent contracts to Bennett, Avril, and Harvin, the Seahawks are not able to afford to pour money into inessential parts, and must focus on the players they see as truly great and important to sustained success. These are the same reasons why the Patriots and Packers have had continued success.

    • http://thecriscokid.com TrippinTheCripple

      Yeah! What he said!

  • http://thecriscokid.com TrippinTheCripple

    I don’t see any downside to resigning Rice or trading for Pryor. The price was right on both.
    Rice is a more-than-competent receiver when healthy and makes those W-T-F catches more often than not. Plus, he’s not afraid to mix it up and block when the ball isn’t coming his way.
    You’re not going to find a better athlete in the 7th round than Pryor. Schneider and Carroll will find ways to utilize his talent and his speed in unconventional ways.
    If neither work out, the Seahawks really haven’t lost anything more than a seventh-round pick.