Miami Dolphins 2014 NFL Draft Big Board: Top 10 WR Rankings

Miami Dolphins 2014 NFL Draft Big Board: Top 10 WR Rankings

Odell Beckham Jr.
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To the surprise of many, the Miami Dolphins have shown significant interest in grabbing a wide receiver in the early rounds of next week's draft. At first glace, Miami's current receiver corps appears set, but there is some uncertainty for the future with Mike Wallace's massive contract and Brian Hartline's limitations as a stater. It's one of the deepest classes at receiver perhaps ever as well. Here are Miami's top 10 options in the draft.

10. Jordan Matthews, Vanderbilt

Jordan Matthews
Spruce Derden-USA TODAY Sports

10. Jordan Matthews, Vanderbilt

Jordan Matthews
Spruce Derden-USA TODAY Sports

Jordan Matthews demonstrates many of the traits scouts look for from productive possession receivers. He's tough and isn't afraid to make difficult receptions over the middle while absorbing big hits. His height is imposing and his straight-line speed is impressive. Matthews could stand to add some bulk for the NFL, however, and isn't nearly as explosive as some of the other receivers in the class.

9. Donte Moncrief, Ole Miss

Donte Moncrief
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9. Donte Moncrief, Ole Miss

Donte Moncrief
Marvin Gentry-USA TODAY Sports

It's hard not to be intrigued by Donte Moncrief's combination of size and speed. He runs a 4.40 40-yard dash at 6-foot-2, 221 pounds. Moncrief is a nightmare matchup for small corners and has the speed to beat bigger defenders. He's a bit raw, though, and appears to lack natural route-running ability and hands. Regardless, his ceiling is incredibly high. A future No. 1 role is plausible with development.

8. Kelvin Benjamin, Florida State

Kelvin Benjamin
Gary A. Vasquez-USA TODAY Sports

8. Kelvin Benjamin, Florida State

Kelvin Benjamin
Gary A. Vasquez-USA TODAY Sports

Florida State's Kelvin Benjamin, the man who caught the game-winning touchdown pass in the BCS National Championship, has been catching a bad rap for his inability to consistently separate. It's hard not to be enthralled with his massive-catch radius and ability to adjust to the football, though. He may high-point the ball better than any receiver in the draft, which could be deadly when combined with his 6-foot-5, 240-pound frame.

7. Cody Latimer, Indiana

Cody Latimer
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7. Cody Latimer, Indiana

Cody Latimer
Trevor Ruszkowski-USA TODAY Sports

One of the fastest-rising prospects in the class, Indiana receiver Cody Latimer, once pegged as a day-three pick, has been getting some first-round buzz in recent weeks. Is the hype real? It legitimately could be. The size (6-foot-2, 215 pounds) is there. The speed (4.39-4.44 range at his pro day) is there too. Blend Latimer's measurables with his superb athleticism and clean hands, and it's easy to see why he's skyrocketing up draft boards.

6. Allen Robinson, Penn State

Allen Robinson
Matthew O'Haren-USA TODAY Sports

6. Allen Robinson, Penn State

Allen Robinson
Matthew O'Haren-USA TODAY Sports

Contrary to Latimer, Penn State's Allen Robinson has been free-falling according to pundits ever since he was initially thought of as a potential first-round pick. While I buy Latimer's rise, I'm selling Robinson's fall. Robinson may not time as well as he plays, but his fluidity for his size compares favorably to Anquan Boldin. His route-running prowess is more than adequate enough to compensate for what he lacks in top-end speed.

5. Brandin Cooks, Oregon State

Brandin Cooks
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5. Brandin Cooks, Oregon State

Brandin Cooks
Jaime Valdez-USA TODAY Sports

Brandin Cooks' blazing speed is what gets your attention. He ran a 4.33 40-yard dash at the combine and routinely left defenders in the dust in the Pac-12. But it's his toughness and ball skills that sell you. Cooks' catch radius is larger than most small, quick receivers of his mold. He would be an ideal future replacement for Mike Wallace as an outside burner while still contributing in the slot in 2014.

4. Marqise Lee, USC

Marqise Lee
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4. Marqise Lee, USC

Marqise Lee
Kirby Lee-USA TODAY Sports

When evaluating Marqise Lee, it's important to watch his 2012 film, which was before his injuries and the turmoil at USC. If he was that explosive receiver who got open with ease before, he can certainly be that receiver again. Lee has the athletic ability to catch anything in his radius and the acceleration to produce big plays after the catch. He certainly can be a legitimate No. 1 receiver in the NFL and would be a good fit in Miami's scheme.

3. Mike Evans, Texas A&M

Mike Evans
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3. Mike Evans, Texas A&M

Mike Evans
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Texas A&M's Mike Evans, projected to go in the top 10 next Thursday, would require trading up for the Dolphins. At 6-foot-5, Evans is going to bolster some team's red-zone productivity. He shows decent speed for a man of his size too. He's a little bit stiff my liking, though -- hence why he's No. 3 on my board while most have him at No. 2.

2. Odell Beckham Jr., LSU

Odell Beckham Jr.
Crystal LoGiudice-USA TODAY Sports

2. Odell Beckham Jr., LSU

Odell Beckham Jr.
Crystal LoGiudice-USA TODAY Sports

A dynamic playmaker, LSU's Odell Beckham Jr. can beat defenses in multiple ways. He has the speed to separate deep and the run-after-catch explosiveness to take a short reception the distance. He possess the route-running prowess to beat defensive backs on the perimeter or in the slot. Oh yeah, he's also a dangerous kick returner. If Beckham Jr. somehow falls through the first 18 picks, he should be a tempting option for the Dolphins.

1. Sammy Watkins, Clemson

Sammy Watkins
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1. Sammy Watkins, Clemson

Sammy Watkins
Geoff Burke-USA TODAY Sports

There is no logical way Sammy Watkins falls in the draft, and the Dolphins, in all likelihood, won't consider trading up into the top five in order to nab him. Watkins could legitimately emerge as one of the league's most dangerous and explosive playmakers as a rookie. His blend of size, speed and acceleration is unmatched in this class.


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