X

Have feedback / suggestions? Let us know!

NFL Seattle Seahawks

Seattle Seahawks’ Minicamp Brawl a Good Sign for 2014 Season

Richard Sherman

Getty Images

On the second day of minicamp, the defending Super Bowl champs showed why they are one of the more intense teams in the NFL. The Seattle Seahawks’ minicamp brawl, which mainly involved superstar cornerback Richard Sherman and wide receiver Phil Bates, is actually a good sign for the upcoming 2014 season.

Wide receiver Bryan Walters hurt his shoulder after he made a diving catch on the sidelines. However, it did not appear that he injured his shoulder until safety Earl Thomas, who was quick on Walters’ trail, landed on him. Wide receiver Doug Baldwin was irate over the play because it was a no-tackling scrimmage.

Things got heated on the next play when Sherman’s press coverage did not sit well with Bates. The two ripped each other’s helmets off and even struck each other in the head once. This led to a clash that involved Percy Harvin, who went right after Sherman. Running back Marshawn Lynch, who was not participating in the scrimmage, did his best to break up the fight while the rest of the team rushed in.

So, how is a fight that involved multiple high-profile players beneficial for the Seahawks?

The obvious impression would be this is a team that needs to get their act together if they want any chance of repeating their championship run. However, I see it as a team that is loaded with a fire and intensity that will make them very difficult to beat. Sure, it is never a good sign when top players are fighting each other, but Seattle beats to their own drum. What may not be good for most teams may actually work in their favor once the season rolls around.

Some fans may look too much into this. The reality is Sherman and the rest of the defense are determined to show that they are what makes the Seahawks tick. Clearly, this does not bode well with the offense, which is why they are prepared to set the tone early as evidence of Bates and Harvin not backing down from getting in the face of a man who just signed a $56 million contract extension. The good news is the competitive nature will help Seattle in the long run.