NFL Detroit Lions

Detroit Lions: Jim Caldwell’s New Drills Call Attention to Fundamentals

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As fans of the Detroit Lions endured the start of one of Michigan’s worst winters, they also enjoyed the pleasure of another gut-wrenchingly disappointing season. The personnel changes were finally made, although not without questionable decisions, and a new coach was brought in, but not without questions about his decision making. Now, this is the team, and Jim Caldwell seems set on at least trying to get the Lions to play a professional brand of football.

The new head coach inherited a team with talent, but severely lacks in discipline and fundamental play. It’s only June, but he’s already implementing some interesting drills, and even utilizing technology to help get his team on track.

During the minicamp team drills, the Lions looked strangely slow, like they were running their plays in slow motion. That’s because they were running their plays in slow motion, for real. Caldwell says that going through the plays in slow motion helps the players focus up on every detail of the play call. You know what? That actually sounds like something that makes sense.

The new buzz words coming out of minicamp are “ladder cam.” The “ladder cam” is an old school form of documenting the quarterback’s every move throughout passing drills, but with updated technology. Matthew Stafford seems to like it, and respects the old school aspect of the work. Despite being one of the most prolific passers in the league throughout the last few seasons, he also threw too many interceptions. Stafford tossed up 19 INTs last season, while watching his completion percentage drop for the second-straight year.

Caldwell seems to be working in many other new drills for the Lions in hopes to hammer home some new ideas, new focus and a better overall understanding of the game. That sounds good so far.

Chris Loud is a Detroit Lions writer for Follow him on Twitter @cfloud, “Like” him on Facebook or add him to your network on Google.