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The 100 Greatest Players In NFL History, 2014 Edition: 90-81

The 100 Greatest NFL Players In History, Numbers 90-81

Steve Young 49ers
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The Top 100: NFL's Greatest Players was a 10-part television series presented by the NFL Network in 2010. But a lot has happened since 2010, especially with current players like Adrian Peterson and Drew Brees making their own mark on the history books. Here now are my updated rankings of the 100 greatest NFL players of all-time, continuing with numbers 90-81.

90. TE Ozzie Newsome, Cleveland Browns (1978-90)

Ozzie Newsome Browns
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90. TE Ozzie Newsome, Cleveland Browns (1978-90)

Ozzie Newsome Browns
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2010 Ranking: No. 73

In his 13-year NFL career, Cleveland Browns TE Ozzie Newsome became just the fifth player in team history to play in parts of three decades. At the time of his retirement in 1990, Newsome became the most prolific tight end in NFL history with 662 receptions, 7,980 yards and 47 touchdowns. In the 1980s, Newsome helped the Browns reach three AFC Championship games in four years between 1986 and 1989.

89. Howie Long, DE, Oakland/Los Angeles Raiders (1981-93)

Howie Long Raiders
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89. Howie Long, DE, Oakland/Los Angeles Raiders (1981-93)

Howie Long Raiders
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2010 Ranking: --

In just his second NFL season, Howie Long became a starter for Oakland's dominant defense in the early 1980s. In his third season, Long helped the Raiders secure a dominant victory in Super Bowl 18, holding the prolific Washington Redskins to nine points. In his career, Long had 84 career sacks, primarily as a 3-4 defense end, and not counting his 7.5 in 1981, a year before the statistic was recorded.

88. Paul Krause, S, Washington Redskins (1964-67), Minnesota Vikings (1968-79)

Paul Krause Vikings
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88. Paul Krause, S, Washington Redskins (1964-67), Minnesota Vikings (1968-79)

Paul Krause Vikings
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2010 Ranking: --

In 1964, Paul Krause had one of the greatest rookie seasons in NFL history. A member of the Washington Redskins, Krause intercepted 12 passes, which is tied for third most by a rookie. But Krause was most known for his career with the Minnesota Vikings. In his 12 seasons in purple, Krause picked off 53 passes, finishing his career with 81, the most in NFL history. Krause helped the Vikings reach four Super Bowls in the 1970s.

87. Troy Aikman, QB, Dallas Cowboys (1989-2000)

Troy Aikman Cowboys
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87. Troy Aikman, QB, Dallas Cowboys (1989-2000)

Troy Aikman Cowboys
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2010 Ranking: No. 80

Troy Aikman became the first Dallas rookie quarterback to start a season opener since Roger Staubach in 1969. Despite plenty of potential, the team finished just 1-15. Three years later, Aikman began one of the most dominant stretches in NFL history. His Dallas teams won three Super Bowls and reached four NFC Championship games from 1992-95. Aikman's 90 wins in the 1990s are the most by any quarterback in any decade.

86. Warren Sapp, DT, Tampa Bay Buccaneers (1995-2003), Oakland Raiders (2004-07)

Warren Sapp Buccaneers
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86. Warren Sapp, DT, Tampa Bay Buccaneers (1995-2003), Oakland Raiders (2004-07)

Warren Sapp Buccaneers
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2010 Ranking: --

Warren Sapp became one of the most dominant defensive tackles in NFL history and was a key contributor in Tampa Bay's Cover 2 defense. He posted an impressive 96.5 sacks as a defensive tackle, 77 with the Bucs. Sapp earned NFL Defensive Player of the Year honors in 1999 when he helped the Buccaneers win its first division title since 1981. In 2002, Sapp helped lead the Bucs' No. 1 defense to their only Super Bowl title.

85. Ed Reed, Baltimore Ravens (2002-2012), Houston Texans (2013), New York Jets (2013)

Ed Reed Ravens
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85. Ed Reed, Baltimore Ravens (2002-2012), Houston Texans (2013), New York Jets (2013)

Ed Reed Ravens
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2010 Ranking: No. 88

In nine of Ed Reed's 11 seasons with the Baltimore Ravens, the playmaking safety made the Pro Bowl. Along with Ray Lewis, Terrell Suggs, and Haloti Ngata, Reed helped anchor a defense that went to three AFC Championship games and a Super Bowl 47 victory. Reed holds NFL records for most postseason interceptions (nine), most interception return yards (1,590), and has the two longest interception returns (106 and 108 yards).

84. Kurt Warner, QB, St. Louis Rams (1998-2003), New York Giants (2004), Arizona Cardinals (2005-09)

Kurt Warner Cardinals
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84. Kurt Warner, QB, St. Louis Rams (1998-2003), New York Giants (2004), Arizona Cardinals (2005-09)

Kurt Warner Cardinals
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2010 Ranking: No. 90

Kurt Warner went from an undrafted free agent in 1994 to a Super Bowl MVP with the St. Louis Rams just five seasons later. When Trent Green went down with an injury in 1999, Warner made the most of his opportunity. He led the Rams to a victory in Super Bowl 34, and two more Super Bowl appearances with St. Louis and Arizona. Warner owns the three highest single-game passing totals in Super Bowl history.

83. Marcus Allen, RB-FB, Oakland Raiders (1982-92), Kansas City Chiefs (1993-97)

Marcus Allen Raiders
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83. Marcus Allen, RB-FB, Oakland Raiders (1982-92), Kansas City Chiefs (1993-97)

Marcus Allen Raiders
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2010 Ranking: No. 85

Marcus Allen was one of the NFL’s best short-yardage runners of all-time, and retired as the all-time rushing touchdown leader. Following his retirement in 1997, he held the single-season record for all-purpose yards (2,314), and was the first player in NFL history to rush for 10,000 yards and receive for 5,000. In just his second season, Allen was the MVP in Super Bowl 18 after rushing for 191 yards and two touchdowns.

82. Willie Davis, DE, Cleveland Browns (1958-59), Green Bay Packers (1960-69)

Willie Davis Packers
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82. Willie Davis, DE, Cleveland Browns (1958-59), Green Bay Packers (1960-69)

Willie Davis Packers
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2010 Ranking: No. 86

Willie Davis was traded from Cleveland to Green Bay in 1960 and became a Hall-of-Fame player. Davis was as durable as he was effective, never missing one game in his 12-year career. He was a major factor in Green Bay’s dynasty in the 1960s, which featured five NFL championships and the first two Super Bowls. He forced the "Million Dollar Fumble" against Johnny Unitas in 1966 that helped get the Packers to Super Bowl I.

81. Steve Young, QB, Tampa Bay Buccaneers (1985-86), San Francisco 49ers (1987-99)

Steve Young 49ers
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81. Steve Young, QB, Tampa Bay Buccaneers (1985-86), San Francisco 49ers (1987-99)

Steve Young 49ers
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2010 Ranking: No. 81

Steve Young had the unenviable task of trying to replace the greatest QB in NFL history in Joe Montana, but Young helped maintain the 49ers winning tradition. After several seasons backing up Montana, Young became a starter in 1991, and in 1994, he won his only Super Bowl after throwing six TD passes against San Diego. Young retired in 1999 as one of the most accurate quarterbacks in NFL history.