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10 NFL People Who Do Not Belong in the Pro Football Hall of Fame

10 NFL People Who Do Not Belong in the Pro Football Hall of Fame

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Being named to the Pro Football Hall of Fame is the greatest honor that any player can receive in their career. From Joe Montana to Jerry Rice and Jim Brown, the greatest players to ever play the game are forever remembered in Canton. However, some of those who have been enshrined have some shaky and questionable Hall of Fame credentials. Here now are the top 10 NFL people who don't belong in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

10. Jan Stenerud, Class of 1991

Jan Stenerud Chiefs
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10. Jan Stenerud, Class of 1991

Jan Stenerud Chiefs
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If the voters had to do it over a second time, Jan Stenerud would not have been the first pure special teams player elected to the Hall of Fame. In 19 seasons, Stenerud missed more than 10 field goals in a season 12 times and also missed 21 career extra-point attempts, not good stats for a Hall of Famer. He also came up small in the Chiefs' 1971 playoff loss to Miami, making only one of four attempts in the longest NFL game ever played.

9. Charlie Sanders, Class of 2007

Charlie Sanders Lions
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9. Charlie Sanders, Class of 2007

Charlie Sanders Lions
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Charlie Sanders was a very good player with the Detroit Lions, but he was never one of the greatest tight ends to ever play the game. Playing a majority of his career with losing teams, Sanders was the primary offensive weapon. He had no seasons with more than 45 receptions and only scored five or more touchdowns in a season just three times. His teams also made the postseason just once with a zero-reception performance in a 5-0 loss to Dallas.

8. Jackie Smith, Class of 1994

Jackie Smith Cardinals
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8. Jackie Smith, Class of 1994

Jackie Smith Cardinals
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Similar to Sanders, Jackie Smith was a good tight end on mostly bad teams in St. Louis, but he is not a Hall of Famer. In seven of his 15 seasons in St. Louis, Smith had fewer than 30 receptions in a season. His teams only made the postseason just twice in St. Louis with no postseason wins. In his only season with Dallas, he dropped a pass in the end zone which was the crucial play in the Cowboys' 35-31 loss to Pittsburgh in Super Bowl XIII.

7. Ray Guy, Class of 2014

Ray Guy Raiders
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7. Ray Guy, Class of 2014

Ray Guy Raiders
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The first pure punter to be enshrined in Canton, Ray Guy was the best punter of all time, but punters don't get an equal break in the NFL. As the only punter drafted in the first round by Al Davis in 1973, Guy became a weapon for Oakland, but no punter, not even Guy, is worth a first-round pick then and even more so now. Guy is unquestionably the greatest punter ever, but that alone does not make him a Hall of Famer.

6. Chris Doleman, Class of 2012

Chris Doleman Vikings
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6. Chris Doleman, Class of 2012

Chris Doleman Vikings
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Chris Doleman recorded 150.5 sacks in his 15-year NFL career, but rarely was he ever dominant. Outside of a two-sack performance in the 1987 playoffs against the 49ers, Doleman was quiet when the Vikings needed him the most. In the only NFC Championship game of his career, Doleman was shut out against Washington in a 17-10 loss. Hall of Fame players play their best in the postseason, but Doleman didn't when it mattered most.

5. Andre Tippett, Class of 2008

Andre Tippett Patriots
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5. Andre Tippett, Class of 2008

Andre Tippett Patriots
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Andre Tippett falls in the same boat as Doleman, a good player in the regular season, but a disappointment in the postseason. With the New England Patriots, Tippett had only three seasons with more than 10 sacks and made the postseason just twice. In five career postseason games, Tippett had just one sack and was shutout in the Patriots' 46-10 blowout loss to Chicago in Super Bowl XX. Simply put, Tippett is not a Hall of Famer.

4. Marv Levy, Class of 2001

Marv Levy Bills
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4. Marv Levy, Class of 2001

Marv Levy Bills
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The first of two coaches to make this list, Buffalo's Marv Levy helped guide the Bills to four-consecutive Super Bowl appearances from 1990-93, but was either blown out or outcoached in all four. Levy took advantage of a weak AFC during that stretch to reach the Super Bowl, but he was outcoached each time. Levy was horribly outcoached in Super Bowl XXV and his teams looked rather pathetic in their blowout losses in Super Bowls 26-28.

3. Bud Grant, Class of 1994

Bud Grant Vikings
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3. Bud Grant, Class of 1994

Bud Grant Vikings
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The ultimate failure in the Super Bowl, Bud Grant's teams lost four Super Bowls in eight seasons and were dominated in all four. Grant, like Levy, had success against mostly mediocre teams. In each Super Bowl, Grant's teams lost by double-digits and never scored more than 14 points, mostly due to Grant's conservative nature on offense. When the stage got bigger, Grant's teams didn't get better, they went the opposite direction.

2. Ron Yary, Class of 2001

Ron Yary Vikings
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2. Ron Yary, Class of 2001

Ron Yary Vikings
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Ron Yary was arguably one of the best offensive linemen in the 1970s, but when the stage got too bright, he shrunk big time. In four Super Bowls, Yary and the Vikings' offense looked outmatched against the AFC defenses. Yary failed to give the Vikings a consistent running attack in any of those games, and in Super Bowl IX, Pittsburgh's L.C. Greenwood completely dominated Yary, rendering the Vikings' offense useless.

1. Thurman Thomas, Class of 2007

Thurman Thomas Bills
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1. Thurman Thomas, Class of 2007

Thurman Thomas Bills
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The biggest choke artist in Super Bowl history, Thurman Thomas is the No. 1 NFL person who does not belong in the Hall of Fame. In four Super Bowls, Thomas came up small. In Super Bowl XXV, he had the most overrated performance in Super Bowl history, rushing for 135 yards against a New York defense that wanted Thomas to run. In his three other Super Bowls, Thomas had less than 50 yards rushing, and lost his helmet to begin Super Bowl XXVI.

Brian Kalchik is a Detroit Lions writer for rantsports.com. Follow him on Twitter, like him on Facebook, and connect with him on Google.