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The 10 Best NFL People Who Are Not in the Pro Football Hall of Fame

10 NFL People Who Belong In The Pro Football Hall of Fame

Pro Football Hall of Fame
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The Pro Football Hall of Fame is the most prestigious honor that any NFL player, coach or contributor can achieve in their career. But in the ultimate irony of it all, only writers can elect members each and every year. In this process, several great NFL people have been passed over in their quest for the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Here now are the 10 greatest NFL people who are not in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

10. Art Modell, Owner, Cleveland Browns (1961-95), Baltimore Ravens (1996-2004)

Art Modell Ravens
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10. Art Modell, Owner, Cleveland Browns (1961-95), Baltimore Ravens (1996-2004)

Art Modell Ravens
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Diehard Cleveland Browns fans will not like this, but Art Modell is definitely a Hall of Fame owner. Modell's major accomplishments include hosting the first Monday Night Football game with the Browns, lobbying other owners in the 1960s to share television revenues and his willingness to move the Browns to the AFC when the merger took place. As an owner for over 30 years, Modell won championships in both Cleveland (1964) and Baltimore (2000).

9. Terrell Davis, RB, Denver Broncos (1995-2002)

Terrell Davis Broncos
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9. Terrell Davis, RB, Denver Broncos (1995-2002)

Terrell Davis Broncos
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Terrell Davis doesn't have the longevity that is attributed to most Hall of Famers, but his ability to perform big time in the postseason makes him a great Hall of Famer candidate. For a four-year stretch (1995-98), Davis was one of, if not the best running back in the NFL. In the postseason, Davis ran for over 100 yards in eight of nine career games. He was also the Super Bowl XXXII MVP and was the 1998 NFL MVP after rushing for 2,008 yards.

8. George Seifert, Coach, San Francisco 49ers (1989-96), Carolina Panthers (1999-2001)

George Seifert 49ers
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8. George Seifert, Coach, San Francisco 49ers (1989-96), Carolina Panthers (1999-2001)

George Seifert 49ers
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In George Seifert's first season as head coach of the 49ers, San Francisco had the best record in the NFL at 14-2 and scored the most points ever in a Super Bowl (55 against Denver in Super Bowl XXIV). In his eight seasons in San Francisco, Seifert never had fewer than 10 wins in a season. Seifert also won two Super Bowls with two different starting quarterbacks (Joe Montana and Steve Young) and reached the NFC Championship game five times.

7. Jerry Smith, TE, Washington Redskins (1965-77)

Washington Redskins
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7. Jerry Smith, TE, Washington Redskins (1965-77)

Washington Redskins
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At the time of his retirement in 1977, Jerry Smith held most of the significant records at the tight end position. Despite playing most of his career in George Allen's conservative offense, Smith's 60 career touchdown receptions was the most by a tight end and stood for 27 years until Shannon Sharpe broke it. Smith's lifestyle is frequently cited as the reason why he's not in, but the Hall of Fame is supposed to be about on-field achievement.

6. Johnny Robinson, Safety, Dallas Texans-Kansas City Chiefs (1960-72)

Kansas City Chiefs
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6. Johnny Robinson, Safety, Dallas Texans-Kansas City Chiefs (1960-72)

Kansas City Chiefs
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For most of his career, Johnny Robinson was overlooked because he played in the AFL, but he deserves to be recognized as a Hall of Famer. Robinson was a six-time All-Pro and a seven-time Pro Bowl player with the Chiefs. He helped Kansas City win three AFL titles and Super Bowl IV where he intercepted a pass. Robinson is just one of six defenders in NFL history to post multiple seasons with double-digit interceptions.

5. Jim Marshall, DE, Cleveland Browns (1960), Minnesota Vikings (1961-79)

Jim Marshall Vikings
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5. Jim Marshall, DE, Cleveland Browns (1960), Minnesota Vikings (1961-79)

Jim Marshall Vikings
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In his 20-year career (19 with Minnesota), defensive end Jim Marshall made two Pro Bowl appearances and holds NFL records for most fumble recoveries (30) and consecutive starts by a defensive end (270). A member of the NFL's All-Decade team for the 1960s and 1970s (2nd team), Marshall was a member of Minnesota's famed "Purple People Eaters" defense that carried the Vikings to four Super Bowl appearances in eight seasons.

4. Ken Stabler, QB, Oakland Raiders (1970-79), Houston Oilers (1980-81), New Orleans Saints (1982-84)

Ken Stabler Raiders
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4. Ken Stabler, QB, Oakland Raiders (1970-79), Houston Oilers (1980-81), New Orleans Saints (1982-84)

Ken Stabler Raiders
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In his 15-year career, Ken Stabler threw for over 25,000 yards and had 194 passing touchdowns as a member of the Oakland Raiders, Houston Oilers and New Orleans Saints. The 1974 NFL MVP, Stabler also led the NFL in passing touchdowns twice (1974, '76). Stabler was one of the greatest fourth quarter and clutch quarterbacks of all time. After years of coming so close, he guided the Raiders to their first Super Bowl victory in Super Bowl XI.

3. Tom Flores, Coach, Oakland-Los Angeles Raiders (1979-87), Seattle Seahawks (1992-94)

Tom Flores Raiders
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3. Tom Flores, Coach, Oakland-Los Angeles Raiders (1979-87), Seattle Seahawks (1992-94)

Tom Flores Raiders
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Another coach who gets disrespected by the voters, Tom Flores not only replaced the great John Madden in Oakland, but he outmatched his more famous predecessor. Flores complied a record of 83-53 as head coach of the Raiders and had a .727 winning percentage in the postseason. He also won two Super Bowls in four seasons as coach of the Raiders and was the first man in NFL history to win a Super Bowl as both a player (IV) and a coach (XV).

2. Roger Craig, RB, San Francisco 49ers (1983-90), Los Angeles Raiders (1991), Minnesota Vikings (1992-93)

Roger Craig 49ers
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2. Roger Craig, RB, San Francisco 49ers (1983-90), Los Angeles Raiders (1991), Minnesota Vikings (1992-93)

Roger Craig 49ers
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One of the most versatile running backs of all time, Roger Craig was the forgotten player on San Francisco's great offenses in the 1980s. Craig became the first player in NFL history to log 1,000 yards in both rushing and receiving (1985) and totaled over 13,000 all-purpose yards in his career. With the 49ers, Craig was a three-time Super Bowl champion and a four-time Pro Bowler.

1. Jerry Kramer, OG-K, Green Bay Packers (1958-68)

Jerry Kramer Packers
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1. Jerry Kramer, OG-K, Green Bay Packers (1958-68)

Jerry Kramer Packers
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Jerry Kramer has been a finalist for the Pro Football Hall of Fame nine times, and his exclusion is a travesty. In 11 seasons, Kramer was one of the greatest guards of all time and made the key block that sealed Green Bay's victory in the Ice Bowl. In addition to being a great guard, he was also a effective kicker, making 29 career field goals. Kramer was a five-time All-Pro and a three-time Pro Bowler.

Brian Kalchik is a Detroit Lions writer for rantsports.com. Follow him on Twitter, like him on Facebook, and connect with him on Google.