What does Duke’s 2013 recruiting class look like?

Duke Blue Devils

Mark Dolejs-US Presswire

Coach Mike Krzyzewski has always been known as one of the best recruiters in all of college basketball. The 65-year-old head basketball coach of the Duke Blue Devils has accrued over 900 wins in his career which adds to the allure of playing for him as well as winning four NCAA championships in his career with Duke. After 32 years at Duke one would think he would start slowing down. However, after the recent commitment of arguably the top recruit in the 2013 class, Jabari Parker, he has only shown that he is hungrier than ever.

Parker, the 6-foot-8, 200 pound shooting guard out of Chicago, Illinois, is the top recruit of Duke’s 2013 recruiting class but the talent does not drop off when it comes to the other two commitments for the Blue Devils’ basketball team. It is a good thing that Duke will boast one of the top recruiting classes in the country because the losses they will incur after this season are from major contributors on the court.

Senior starters Seth Curry, Ryan Kelly and Mason Plumlee will all be graduating from Duke in the spring and they must be replaced. The senior trio is the top three on this year’s team in minutes played and points scored while Plumlee is the top rebounder. Kelly is shooting an amazing 50% from three point range this year, sinking 23 in 46 attempts.

These three will be replaced by Parker, shooting guard Matt Jones and small forward Semi Ojeleye. Jones, at 6 foot 4 and 180 pounds, reminds many scouts of Ray Allen with his shooting prowess and quick catch and shoot ability. Ojeleye possesses a high basketball IQ and could possibly replace Kelly as the team’s main three point shooter in a few years.

Overall, the Blue Devils should not have a problem replacing this year’s big three because Coach K is one of the best at recruiting for need and developing fringe recruits into very, very good college basketball players. They are currently ranked number one in the nation and show no signs of stopping in the years to come.


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