Top 5 Players With Dual Citizenship Who Chose To Play For The US

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Top 5 Players With Dual Citizenship Who Chose To Play For The US

Top 5 Players with Dual Citizenship who chose to play for the U.S.
Kirby Lee-USA TODAY Sports

The U.S. Men's National Team has become a melting pot as of late, with various players holding dual citizenship and choosing to play for the Stars and Stripes. While the arrival of such players is not always viewed favorably, in reality, their allegiance to the U.S. can only increase the quality and competitiveness of coach Jurgen Klinsmann's team.

Considering that American society is composed of a mix of many different cultures, it makes sense that this unique aspect would carry over into the national team. In truth, it would be foolish for Team U.S.A. not to take advantage of this, and players with dual citizenship who choose to play for a country different than their birth are very common. Legends like Ferenc Puskas, born in Hungary, and Alfredo Di Stefano, born in Argentina, played for multiple different countries, with Puskas playing for Hungary and Spain, and Di Stefano with Spain, Argentina and Colombia.

German internationals Miroslav Klose and Lukas Podolski were both born in Poland, but have become stars for Germany, while Cape Verde born Luís "Nani" Carlos Almeida da Cunha and Képler "Pepe" Laveran Lima Ferreira play for Portugal.

The list goes on, and in America, one group that has been taking the national team by storm is the German-American contingent, composed of players with U.S. military fathers and German mothers. Although quality players, they knew they had a better chance to play for the U.S. team instead of sitting on the bench for Germany or not making the team at all, an important decision that players like this face.

Without further ado, here are the top five players with dual citizenship who chose to play for the U.S.

Giancarlo Santoro is a soccer writer for RantSports.com, “Like” him on Facebook, Follow him on Twitter, or add him to your network on Google.

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5. Jose Torres

Jose Torres
Christopher Hanewinckel-USA TODAY Sports

Representing the ever growing Mexican-American population is 26-year-old Jose Torres. Torres began his professional career in Mexico's Liga MX with Pachuca C.F., before being sold to fellow Mexican side Tigres UANL in 2012. With a Mexican father and American mother, Torres was eligible to play for both countries, who had been keeping a close eye on his development. In 2008, he was called in to the U.S. National Team camp by former coach Bob Bradley and made his debut days later against Cuba.

A technically gifted player with the ability to find the killer pass, Torres has made 26 appearances for Team U.S.A. so far and played in the 2010 World Cup in South Africa.

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4. Mikkel Diskerud

Mikkel Diskerud
Dennis Wierzbicki-USA TODAY Sports

One of two players on the U.S. National Team with Scandinavian roots, Mikkel "Mix" Diskerud was born in Oslo, Norway's capital, and represented the Norwegian National Team at U18 and U19 levels. Born to a Norwegian father and an American mother from Arizona, Diskerud stated as a teenager that he would be open to play for either Norway or the U.S., depending on who approached him first.

After strong performances with former Norwegian side Stabæk Fotball Diskerud was called up to the U.S. U20 and U23 teams, and made his debut for the senior team in 2010. At 23, Diskerud is an exciting prospect who already has 16 caps and two goals for the U.S. team. He currently plays for Rosenborg in Norway.

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3. Juan Agudelo

Juan Agudelo
Trevor Ruszkowksi-USA TODAY Sports

At only 21, Colombian born striker Juan Agudelo could be a future star for the U.S. National Team. After his family moved from Colombia to New York when Agudelo was seven, he worked his way up through the New York Red Bulls Academy system, and made his professional debut for the Red Bulls at 17.

After scoring six goals in three seasons for the Red Bulls, Agudelo was traded in 2012 to Chivas USA, and spent last season at the New England Revolution, where he scored seven goals in 14 games, earning him a loan move to Stoke City in England's Premier League. Choosing the U.S. over Colombia, Agudelo played at U17, U20 and U23 levels, and has two goals in 17 appearances for the U.S. senior team.

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2. Stuart Holden

Stuart Holden
Jerry Lai-USA TODAY Sports

U.S. fans know 28-year-old midfielder Stuart Holden well, but what they probably didn't know is that he was born in Scotland. After moving to Texas with his family when he was 10, Holden signed with EPL side Sunderland in 2005 following strong performances at Clemson University. After suffering a fractured eye socket when he was attacked outside of an English pub, Holden injured his ankle and left Sunderland for MLS side Houston Dynamo, failing to make an appearance in England.

His sound play in the Houston midfield attracted interest from English side Bolton Wanderers, who signed Holden in 2010. Around the same time, Holden made his debut for the U.S. National Teamand has gone on to score three goals in 25 appearances.

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1. Jermaine Jones

Jermaine Jones
David Richard-USA TODAY Sports

Arguably the best American player with dual citizenship, defensive midfielder Jermaine Jones has become vital to the USMNT since making his debut back in 2010 and has two goals in 38 appearances. Born to an African-American Army soldier and German mother, Jones spent time as a kid in the United States before moving back to Germany with his mother. Having played for multiple teams in Germany's Bundesliga, including a brief loan spell with EPL side Blackburn Rovers, Jones currently plays for FC Schalke 04, and is one of the few Americans who has played in the Champions League.

In truth, the U.S. team is lucky to have the 32-year-old Jones, who actually made three appearances for the German national team in 2008. But because the games were considered friendlies, FIFA allowed Jones to change nationalities, and he has since become a regular starter for the U.S. team.

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  • Phil Naegely

    Could have added Johannoson (spelling).

  • Stuart Wilson

    No Tim Howard? Surely he is better than most if not all those you listed…