On This Date in Pittsburgh Penguins History

1999

  • Pittsburgh Penguins goalie Tom Barrasso made 20 saves to shut out the Toronto Maple Leafs, 2-0, in the opening round of the Eastern Conference Semifinals (Toronto ended up winning the series in six games); it was Barrasso’s sixth, and final, post-season shutout with the Pens

1936

The Pittsburgh Pirates were one of two American teams to join the NHL in the 1925-26 season (after the Boston Bruins were the first American team to do so the season prior).  The team began wearing the colors orange and black in the 1929-30 season.  They also began struggling to win games with a league-worst record of 5-36-3.  Due to the stock market crash that October, the steel industry began to suffer leaving the owners $400,000 in debt, so they requested permission to move to Philadelphia.  The move took place the following season (1930-31) and with the move came the name change to Philadelphia Quakers.

From 1931 – 1936, the Philadelphia organization got permission from the league to temporarily cease operations (getting permission at the starts of each season).  After five seasons, the team would permanently cease on May 7, 1936 ultimately due to the Great Depression.

STICK-TAPS TO PittsburghHockey.net AND THE Sports Encyclopedia

TODAY’S PENGUINS TRIVIA QUESTION:

Who led the Pittsburgh Penguins in penalty minutes AND shots on goal in 1991-92?

Find out tomorrow!

ANSWER (to yesterday’s TRIVIA QUESTIONCLICK HERE to view it):

2010-11 season against the New York Islanders / Rick DiPietro

Do you have a trivia question that could be featured on this page or am I missing a major Penguins historical fact for one of the “On This Date” posts?? BE SURE to leave a comment below OR email me at thesteelcitysportsfan@gmail.com!!

Stephanie Lewark is a featured Pittsburgh Penguins columnist for Rant Sports. If you enjoy her articles / posts, you can follow her on Twitter, check out her personal Facebook page (via Networked Blogs), visit her personal Tumblr page, or stop by her Pinterest page.

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