20 Sports That Don’t Get Enough Coverage

20 Sports That Don't Get Enough Coverage

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It may be a while before Whiffle Ball makes this list, however, there is hope if a couple of the sports get the cred they deserve. So maybe next year Whiffle Ball, but until then, these are the 20 sports that don't get enough coverage.



20. Show Jumping

Show Jumping
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20. Show Jumping

Show Jumping
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Horse racing takes brute speed and endurance. For horse lovers, that's pretty ho-hum. Show jumping is a top-tier event that displays the beauty, strength and grace of equine contestants.

19. Synchronized Swimming

Synchronized Swimming
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19. Synchronized Swimming

Synchronized Swimming
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When synchronized swimming first debuted as an Olympic sport in 1984, most thought it was one of those gimmicky events that would be around only one, maybe two, Summer Games. It's 30 years later and the "water ballet" is still going strong.

18. Jai Alai

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18. Jai Alai

Jai Alai
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During the "Miami Vice" opening credits, a brief glimpse of a Jai Alai competition was flashed. Kids across America wondered about this odd sport with the 3-feet arm extension basket and that whipped a ball at great speed. There is such great speed that Jai Alai is called, "the fastest sport in the world." The ball regularly clocks 170 MPH -- it's lucky those dudes wear helmets.

17. Curling

Curling
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17. Curling

Curling
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Curling is the Winter Olympics curiosity sport where its competitors slide large stones and then quickly broom the ice to give it a proper course. It takes great skill and teamwork, and has been dubbed, "chess on ice."

16. Polo

Polo
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16. Polo

Polo
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To live vicariously through a knighted Englishmen is every kids dream, right? The former Olympic sport is played on horseback, using long mallets to hit a small wooden ball into the goal. It's a lot like ice hockey on horses.

15. Badminton

Badminton
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15. Badminton

Badminton
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This isn't the badminton you used to play against your granny during family picnics. Competitive badminton has been an Olympic sport since 1992 and is played with weighted shuttlecocks instead of a ball like other racquet sports. The feathered projectile's peculiar aerodynamics make this one of the most difficult racquet sports.

14. Sumo Wrestling

Sumo Wrestling
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14. Sumo Wrestling

Sumo Wrestling
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Sumo is a full contact wrestling event that has been around since the late 1500's; it was originally used as a test of strength for Japanese soldiers. Modern sumo wrestlers live in highly-disciplined communal stables. The winner of a sumo match must push his opponent out of the ring.

13. Horseshoes

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13. Horseshoes

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Most everyone has pitched a game of horseshoes, but few know there is a governing body for professional horseshoe pitchers. The National Horseshoe Pitching Association holds tournaments where pro pitchers compete against one another. The annual World Horseshoe Tournament is held indoors and lasts two weeks.

12. Greyhound Racing

Greyhound Racing
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12. Greyhound Racing

Greyhound Racing
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With horse racing so popular, it's pure thievery that greyhound racing doesn't have a nationally televised race akin to the Kentucky Derby. Greyhound racing takes the human element out of equation, and with no jockey, it is impossible to fix races.

11. Darts

Darts
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11. Darts

Darts
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The World Darts Federation (WDF) consists of 655 ranked players from 68 countries. Many people play darts for fun, but unless one can consistently throw three consecutive bullseyes, it's highly suggested not to quit that day job.

10. Ice Yachting

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10. Ice Yachting

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In the late 18th century, there was an ice yachting headquarters in Poughkeepsie, NY where ice yachts regularly raced on the Hudson River. Modern day ice yachting in the U.S. mainly consists of Americans and Canadians racing on the Great Lakes. The sport is also popular on the Gulf of Finland.

9. Bull Riding

bull riding
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9. Bull Riding

Bull Riding
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While some NASCAR fans watch the sport only for the macabre desire to see a violent crash, it's a wonder that bull riding isn't more popular. Bull riding is aptly called, "the most dangerous eight seconds in sports." The eight seconds refers to the amount of time the rider must stay on the bull in order to qualify for advancement in competitions.

8. Ultimate

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8. Ultimate

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Ultimate is played a lot like football with the two major differences. It is played with a disc (frisbee), and when a receiver makes a catch, they are not allowed to move besides making another throw. In 2012, a professional league was formed, American Ultimate Disc League (AUDL). The Philadelphia Spinners beat the Indianapolis Alley Cats 29-22 in the first AUDL championship at the Silverdome in Pontiac, MI.

7. Beach Volleyball

beach volleyball
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7. Beach Volleyball

beach volleyball
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Beach volleyball originated in Southern California during the 1920's. Professional beach volleyball's popularity skyrocketed during the 80's and 90's. Then, it's governing association (FIVB) enforced a dress code and men quit watching.

6. Fencing

Fencing
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6. Fencing

Fencing
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Fencing is one of only five sports that has survived each Olympic competition. Around since 1458, the sport was developed just before dueling was officially banned. Participants wear protective clothing and use one of three different weapons -- a foil, epee or sabre, all of which require different strategies.

5. Surfing

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5. Surfing

surfing
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Most surfers ride waves during their leisure time. Then, you have the non-professionals who eat, breath and spend every waking moment thirsting for that one elusive wave to give them the ride of their life. The first surfers were indigenous Polynesians.

4. Underwater Hockey

Underwater Hockey
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4. Underwater Hockey

Underwater Hockey
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The most live spectator-unfriendly sport imaginable, underwater hockey is also one of the most physically demanding. With underwater cameras, this sport needs to be regularly televised. A diving mask is used instead of goggles to give the swimmer unobstructed sight of the entire playing pool.

3. Cricket

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3. Cricket

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Cricket is easily the world's most biggest sport not to have gained even a sniff of U.S. popularity. First played in England during Tudor rule in the early 1500's, it became the country's national sport at the end of the 19th century. Cricket looks similar to baseball -- a flat paddle-shaped bat is used to hit a bowled ball.

2. Karate

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2. Karate

Karate
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Karate fans had reason to be excited when the MMA was formed. However, traditionalists quickly grew tired of MMA, as it was more like a glorified state-fair tough man contest. Karate has never been an Olympic sport even though the World Karate Federation says there are more than 100 million active participants.

1. Special Olympics World Games

Special Olympics World Games
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1. Special Olympics World Games

Special Olympics World Games
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If there were any justice in the world, the Special Olympics World Games would be as widely anticipated as the Super Bowl. Founded in 1968, the Special Olympics boast 4.2 million participants from 170 nations. Local events can be found somewhere in one of those countries on any day of the year. The Special Olympics World Game have the same format as the Olympics games -- every two years, alternating summer and winter games.

 

 


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